Google says senators' Gmail accounts targeted by foreign hackers

Google says senators' Gmail accounts targeted by foreign hackers
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Foreign government hackers targeted the personal Gmail accounts of multiple senators and Senate staffers, a Google spokesperson told CNN Thursday.

The news comes a day after Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenOn The Money: Inside the Mueller report | Cain undeterred in push for Fed seat | Analysis finds modest boost to economy from new NAFTA | White House says deal will give auto sector B boost Government report says new NAFTA would have minimal impact on economy Hillicon Valley: Washington preps for Mueller report | Barr to hold Thursday presser | Lawmakers dive into AI ethics | FCC chair moves to block China Mobile | Dem bill targets 'digital divide' | Microsoft denies request for facial recognition tech MORE (D-Ore.) said in a letter to Senate leaders that a technology company informed senators and staffers that their personal accounts were hacked and that the Senate's security office "apparently lacks the authority" to guard against the threats. 

Google confirmed to The Hill that it was the technology company to which Wyden referred, but declined to say who specifically was targeted, when the attempted hacking took place or if it was successful.

Google sends “these out of an abundance of caution — the notice does not necessarily mean that the account has been compromised or that there is a widespread attack,” a Google spokesperson told The Hill.

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Google confirmed to CNN that it was the technology company to which Wyden referred, but declined to say who specifically was targeted, when the attempted hacking took place or if it was successful. 

Microsoft said earlier this year that it identified and stopped hacking attempts against three congressional candidates in the 2018 midterms, of which Sen. Claire McCaskillClaire Conner McCaskillBig Dem names show little interest in Senate Gillibrand, Grassley reintroduce campus sexual assault bill Endorsements? Biden can't count on a flood from the Senate MORE revealed she was one.

Russian hackers successfully penetrated the servers of the Democratic National Committee and the email of Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Nadler: I don't understand why Mueller didn't charge Donald Trump Jr., others in Trump Tower meeting Kellyanne Conway: Mueller didn't need to use the word 'exoneration' in report MORE's then-campaign chairman, John Podesta in 2016. Special counsel Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE in July indicted 12 Russian military officers for the DNC hack.

Wyden blamed the Russian “Fancy Bear” group in his letter and announced he would introduce legislation requiring the security office to help senators and members of their staff with cybersecurity for their personal devices and accounts.

“The November election grows ever closer, Russia continues its attacks on our democracy, and the Senate simply does not have the luxury of further delays,” he wrote.

Neither Google nor Wyden's office immediately returned requests for comment from The Hill.