WikiLeaks rips Guardian report, bets $1M there was no Manafort-Assange meeting

WikiLeaks on Tuesday afternoon ripped a new Guardian report alleging secret talks between former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortCollege admissions scandal underscores importance of attorney ethics in America Five things to watch for as White House readies for Mueller report As Russia collusion fades, Ukrainian plot to help Clinton emerges MORE and WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, saying the organization would bet $1 million there was no meeting between the two men.

"Remember this day when the Guardian permitted a serial fabricator to totally destroy the paper's reputation," the WikiLeaks Twitter account posted. "@WikiLeaks is willing to bet the Guardian a million dollars and its editor's head that Manafort never met Assange."

ADVERTISEMENT

The Guardian reported that Manafort held private conversations with Assange inside London's Ecuadorian Embassy around the time he joined then-candidate Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpSenate GOP budget ignores Trump, cuts defense Trump says he'll nominate Stephen Moore to Fed White House: ISIS territory in Syria has been 100 percent eliminated MORE's campaign team. They met multiple times between 2013 and 2016, according to the paper.

WikiLeaks, months after a meeting with Manafort, released a trove of emails hacked from the Democratic National Committee by Russian intelligence officers. Manafort has denied any involvement in the WikiLeaks hack.

The organization ultimately published thousands of emails that the CIA concluded were stolen by Russia’s military intelligence agency.

Manafort was previously said to be cooperating with Robert MuellerRobert Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE’s investigation in exchange for a plea deal, but new filings Monday from the special counsel say Manafort violated his plea agreement by lying to federal prosecutors.

In September, Manafort pleaded guilty to two federal charges as part of a deal with federal prosecutors to avoid a second criminal trial in Washington, D.C.

The deal came after a Virginia jury convicted him on eight counts of bank and tax fraud. The jury deadlocked on another 10 charges, and federal prosecutors said they would seek to dismiss the remaining counts as part of the agreement.