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Stone declines Dem request for interview, invokes Fifth Amendment

Republican operative and longtime Trump ally Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneTrump preparing another 100 pardons, commutations before leaving office: reports Vice chair of Oregon Young Republicans group among those arrested at Capitol Trump supporters show up to DC for election protest MORE is resisting a request for documents and an interview from Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee, citing his Fifth Amendment rights.

In a letter released Tuesday by Sen. Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinBottom line Trump vetoes bipartisan driftnet fishing bill Dumping Abraham Lincoln? A word of advice to the 'cancel culture' MORE (Calif.), the top Democrat on the Judiciary Committee, Stone’s attorney described the document request as “unreasonably broad” in scope and characteristic of a “fishing expedition.”

Grant Smith, the attorney, also wrote that Stone would invoke the Fifth Amendment to avoid sitting for an interview and to protect himself from being ensnared in “ambiguous circumstances.”

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Feinstein initially requested documents from Stone in November 2017 as part of lawmaker efforts to probe any links between President TrumpDonald TrumpGiuliani used provisional ballot to vote in 2020 election, same method he disparaged in fighting to overturn results Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Fox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE and Russia. The documents requested from Stone include communications between him and WikiLeaks, as well as those with Russian officials and members of the Trump campaign.

Stone indicated in April that he would provide the documents, The Associated Press reported at the time, though he described the request as “approaching absurd” and based on “numerous presumptions.” 

In a Dec. 3 letter made public by Feinstein on Tuesday, Stone ruled out the request.

“Mr. Stone respectfully declines to produce any documents and declines the invitation for an interview,” Smith wrote. “The production of documents that may be responsive to the unreasonably broad scope of the imprecise, fishing expedition, request would unquestionably be a testimonial act protected by the U.S. Constitution.”

Feinstein does not have the power to subpoena Stone in order to compel him to testify before lawmakers or deliver documents. That power would fall to Judiciary Committee Chairman Chuck GrassleyChuck Grassley3 ways Biden will reshape regulatory policy Biden's minimum wage push faces uphill battle with GOP Impeachment trial tests Trump's grip on Senate GOP MORE (R-Iowa).

Stone has drawn scrutiny from lawmakers on Capitol Hill and from special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) MuellerWhy a special counsel is guaranteed if Biden chooses Yates, Cuomo or Jones as AG Barr taps attorney investigating Russia probe origins as special counsel CNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump MORE as a result of his public pronouncements about WikiLeaks before the 2016 election. Stone appeared to forecast the Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonJuan Williams: The real 'Deep State' is pro-Trump Rep. John Katko: Why I became the first Republican lawmaker to support impeachment Can we protect our country — from our rulers, and ourselves? MORE document releases by WikiLeaks in the weeks and months before the organization began publishing emails from the account of John Podesta, Clinton's campaign chairman, that have since been tied to a Russian hacking operation.

Mueller appears to be probing whether Stone or any other individuals in Trump’s orbit had advanced knowledge of WikiLeaks’ plans. Stone maintains that he didn’t, and that his tweets and other public statements were based on publicly available information.

Smith also pointed out in the letter to Feinstein that Stone sat for a closed-door interview with the House Intelligence Committee in its now-defunct investigation into Russian interference, a transcript of which is expected to be released by the committee at some point in the near future.

Stone did not immediately respond to a request for comment.