Dems demand Pompeo brief Congress on whether he discussed Assange with Ecuadorian official

A group of top Democrats is requesting that Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoOvernight Defense: Details on Senate's 0B defense bill | Bill rejects Trump plan to skirt budget caps | Backfills money for border wall | Defense chief says more troops could head to Mideast Trump defense chief: US may send more troops to Middle East amid Iran tensions Pompeo slams 'unconscionable' release of 'American Taliban' MORE brief Congress on his meeting last month with Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Jose Valencia, specifically demanding he provide details on whether WikiLeaks’s founder Julian Assange’s future in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London was discussed.

In the letter, sent Tuesday, the Democrats — including Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerNo agreement on budget caps in sight ahead of Memorial Day recess Ex-White House photographer roasts Trump: 'This is what a cover up looked like' under Obama Pelosi: Trump 'is engaged in a cover-up' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezEnding the Cyprus arms embargo will increase tensions in the Eastern Mediterranean We can accelerate a cure for Alzheimer's The Hill's 12:30 Report: Manafort sentenced to total of 7.5 years in prison MORE (D-N.J.) — wrote that they “remain deeply interested” in whether Pompeo discussed Assange with Valencia.

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“As you are aware, in January 2017, the unclassified report by the U.S. Intelligence Community assessed with high confidence that Russian military intelligence used proxies to transfer hacked data obtained in cyber operations to WikiLeaks,” the letter reads. “These activities were explicitly intended to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.”

The lawmakers asked Pompeo to inform Congress next week if he asked Valencia to confirm a report that former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortBanker charged for allegedly approving Manafort loans for Trump job House Democrat 'fixed' Trump's infographic about Mueller's investigation Michael Caputo eyes congressional bid MORE met with Assange in the Ecuadorian Embassy, as well as for logs and other information tracking Assange’s visitors.

“Congress and the American people deserve answers about foreign interference in our elections and your efforts to hold accountable those responsible,” the letter reads.

Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinThreat of impeachment takes oxygen out of 2019 agenda Senate Democrats request watchdog, Red Cross probe DHS detention facilities Iraq War looms over Trump battle with Iran MORE (D-Ill.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFeinstein, Iranian foreign minister had dinner amid tensions: report Jeffrey Rosen officially sworn in as deputy attorney general This week: Democrats, White House set for infrastructure, budget talks MORE (D-Calif.), as well as Reps. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) and Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Pelosi fires back in feud with Trump Tillerson told lawmakers Putin was more prepared than Trump for meeting: report Tillerson meets with House Foreign Affairs Committee MORE (D-N.Y.) also signed the letter.

Investigators for both Congress and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerGraham: Mueller investigation a 'political rectal exam' House progressive: Pelosi 'has it right' on impeachment Democrats talk subpoena for Mueller MORE’s investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia have considered WikiLeaks to be a prominent area of interest in probing election interference.

The group released two sets of hacked Democratic emails in the months ahead of the 2016 election: One shortly ahead of the Democratic National Convention, and another just days before the election.

Reports point toward U.S. prosecutors preparing to file charges against Assange, if they have not been filed under seal already. A court filing made in a different case by a prosecutor who has worked on the WikiLeaks case used Assange’s name, indicating that he could soon face an indictment.

The Guardian also reported last month that Manafort had met with Assange ahead of the election. Both WikiLeaks and Manafort have denied the report and suggested that they will take legal action against the newspaper.

Assange has stayed in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012. The United Kingdom and Ecuador recently reached a deal that would allow the WikiLeaks founder to leave the premises without facing extradition for charges abroad.

However, Assange rejected the agreement, with his attorney saying that it did not protect Assange from being extradited to the U.S.