Dems demand Pompeo brief Congress on whether he discussed Assange with Ecuadorian official

A group of top Democrats is requesting that Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoBill Maher says he's 'glad' David Koch is dead Trump spurs new wave of economic angst by escalating China fight Trump on North Korean projectile launches: Kim 'likes testing missiles' MORE brief Congress on his meeting last month with Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Jose Valencia, specifically demanding he provide details on whether WikiLeaks’s founder Julian Assange’s future in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London was discussed.

In the letter, sent Tuesday, the Democrats — including Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerJewish Democratic congresswoman and veteran blasts Trump's 'disloyalty' comments Schumer says Trump encouraging anti-Semites Saagar Enjeti: Biden's latest blunder; Krystal Ball: Did Schumer blow our chance to beat McConnell? MORE (D-N.Y.) and Senate Foreign Relations Committee ranking member Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezPelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid House passes temporary immigration protections for Venezuelans Senate panel advances bipartisan bill to lower drug prices amid GOP blowback MORE (D-N.J.) — wrote that they “remain deeply interested” in whether Pompeo discussed Assange with Valencia.

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“As you are aware, in January 2017, the unclassified report by the U.S. Intelligence Community assessed with high confidence that Russian military intelligence used proxies to transfer hacked data obtained in cyber operations to WikiLeaks,” the letter reads. “These activities were explicitly intended to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.”

The lawmakers asked Pompeo to inform Congress next week if he asked Valencia to confirm a report that former Trump campaign chairman Paul ManafortPaul John ManafortEx-Trump campaign aide Rick Gates testifies against former Obama counsel Gregory Craig Trial of ex-Obama White House counsel suddenly postponed Top Mueller probe prosecutor to join Georgetown Law as lecturer MORE met with Assange in the Ecuadorian Embassy, as well as for logs and other information tracking Assange’s visitors.

“Congress and the American people deserve answers about foreign interference in our elections and your efforts to hold accountable those responsible,” the letter reads.

Sens. Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility House panel investigating decision to resume federal executions To combat domestic terrorism, Congress must equip law enforcement to fight rise in white supremacist attacks MORE (D-Ill.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTrailer shows first look at Annette Bening as Dianne Feinstein Trump administration urges Congress to reauthorize NSA surveillance program The Hill's Morning Report - More talk on guns; many questions on Epstein's death MORE (D-Calif.), as well as Reps. Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) and Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelNadler asks other House chairs to provide records that would help panel in making impeachment decision Trump moves forward with billion F-16 sale to Taiwan Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid MORE (D-N.Y.) also signed the letter.

Investigators for both Congress and special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerMueller report fades from political conversation Trump calls for probe of Obama book deal Democrats express private disappointment with Mueller testimony MORE’s investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia have considered WikiLeaks to be a prominent area of interest in probing election interference.

The group released two sets of hacked Democratic emails in the months ahead of the 2016 election: One shortly ahead of the Democratic National Convention, and another just days before the election.

Reports point toward U.S. prosecutors preparing to file charges against Assange, if they have not been filed under seal already. A court filing made in a different case by a prosecutor who has worked on the WikiLeaks case used Assange’s name, indicating that he could soon face an indictment.

The Guardian also reported last month that Manafort had met with Assange ahead of the election. Both WikiLeaks and Manafort have denied the report and suggested that they will take legal action against the newspaper.

Assange has stayed in the Ecuadorian Embassy in London since 2012. The United Kingdom and Ecuador recently reached a deal that would allow the WikiLeaks founder to leave the premises without facing extradition for charges abroad.

However, Assange rejected the agreement, with his attorney saying that it did not protect Assange from being extradited to the U.S.