SPONSORED:

Lawmakers raise security concerns about China building NYC subway cars

Lawmakers raise security concerns about China building NYC subway cars
© Getty

A bipartisan group of House members from New York are raising concerns about Chinese involvement in building New York City subway cars, zeroing in on the potential that the new train cars could be hacked or controlled remotely.

The group of 15 lawmakers, led by Reps. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceHillicon Valley: Simulated cyberattack success | New bill for election security funding | Amazon could be liable for defective products Lawmakers introduce bill to help election officials address cyber vulnerabilities House lawmakers to launch probe into DHS excluding NY from Trusted Traveler Program MORE (D-N.Y.) and John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHillicon Valley: GOP chairman says defense bill leaves out Section 230 repeal | Senate panel advances FCC nominee | Krebs says threats to election officials 'undermining democracy' Katko announces bid to serve as top Republican on Homeland Security panel Katko fends off Democratic opponent in New York race MORE (R-N.Y.), wrote a letter to the New York City Transit Authority and the Metropolitan Transit Authority (MTA) recently to “raise concerns regarding the safety and security” of New York City’s transit system following MTA’s decision to allow a Chinese-owned company to design new rail cars for the city.

“As you may be aware, critical infrastructure systems around the country have been increasingly targeted in recent years as part of coordinated hacking attempts and other forms of systematic interference, often stemming directly from foreign governments,” the lawmakers wrote.

ADVERTISEMENT

“These actions are part of comprehensive efforts to undermine U.S. economic competitiveness and national security, and we have serious concerns regarding MTA’s involvement with some of those same foreign governments and the protections in place to ensure that our subway systems remain safe and secure,” they added.

In 2018, MTA announced that the winners of its “MTA Genius Transit Challenge” would include the China Railway Rolling Stock Corporation (CRRC), which proposed an investment of $50 million of its own funds to develop a new subway car in New York City. The challenge was announced in 2017 in order to upgrade the subway system.

While the members acknowledged that “no U.S. companies currently manufacture transit railcars,” they stressed that they have “serious concerns regarding the intimate involvement of a Chinese state-owned enterprise in these efforts.”

They specifically pointed to concerns around rail cars being built that would include Wi-Fi systems and train control technology that could be susceptible to hacking or other cyberattacks and asked that MTA respond to questions around how it planned to ensure the cybersecurity of its rail cars.

The letter from the House members comes after Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerChuck SchumerBipartisan governors call on Congress to pass coronavirus relief package Pelosi, Schumer endorse 8 billion plan as basis for stimulus talks Funding bill hits snag as shutdown deadline looms MORE (D-N.Y.) called on the Commerce Department last week to “thoroughly investigate” CRRC.  

“Given what we know about how cyberwarfare works, and recent attacks that have hit transportation and infrastructure hubs across the country, the Department of Commerce must give the green light and thoroughly check any proposals or work China’s CRRC does on behalf of the New York subway system, including our signals, Wi-Fi and more,” Schumer said in a statement.

CRRC, which is the world’s largest passenger train manufacturer, is also planning to bid on building Metro cars for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) in Washington, D.C. Reuters reported earlier this month that the company plans to bid on a WMATA contract to build new Metro cars that is worth more than $500 million. The company is also involved in building rail cars in Los Angeles, Boston, Philadelphia and Chicago.

While CRRC did not immediately respond to comment on this story, it said in a statement after winning the MTA challenge that “we look forward to introducing CRRC’s design philosophy focused on accelerating the pace subway vehicles are procured and deployed to the New York transit system."

The Chinese company’s involvement in the D.C. Metro system is an issue that has raised concerns among Senate Democrats who represent Virginia and Maryland, particularly in light of recent Trump administration moves against Chinese telecommunications companies involved in the roll out of fifth generation wireless technology, or 5G.

Last week, Sens. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerHillicon Valley: Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security | Biden says China must play by 'international norms' | House Democrats use Markup app for leadership contest voting Senate Intelligence Committee leaders warn of Chinese threats to national security Defense policy bill would create new cyber czar position MORE (D-Va.), Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineOvernight Defense: Lawmakers release compromise defense bill in defiance of Trump veto threat | Senate voting next week on blocking UAE arms sale | Report faults lack of training, 'chronic fatigue' in military plane crashes Senate to vote next week on blocking Trump's UAE arms sale Congress set for chaotic year-end sprint MORE (D-Va.), Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenOn The Money: COVID-19 relief picks up steam as McConnell, Pelosi hold talks | Slowing job growth raises fears of double-dip recession | Biden officially announces Brian Deese as top economic adviser GOP blocks effort to make payroll tax deferral optional for federal workers Democratic senators unveil bill to ban discrimination in financial services industry MORE (D-Md.), and Ben CardinBenjamin (Ben) Louis CardinDemocratic senators urge Facebook to take action on anti-Muslim bigotry On The Money: Biden, Democratic leaders push for lame-duck coronavirus deal | Business groups shudder at Sanders as Labor secretary | Congress could pass retirement bill as soon as this year Top Democrat: Congress could pass retirement bill as soon as this year MORE (D-Md.) introduced a bill that would renew federal funding to WMATA, but also prevent WMATA from using those funds “on a contract for rolling stock from any country that meets certain criteria related to illegal subsidies for state-owned enterprises.”

All four of those senators previously raised cybersecurity concerns about WMATA allowing a Chinese company to build rail cars, suggesting that the bill would ban funds for contracts with Chinese companies.

In January, the same group of senators sent a letter to WMATA asking for details on how the transit agency planned to “ascertain and mitigate” any involvement of a foreign country in building new rail cars, and how it planned to defend rail cars against potential cyber espionage.

“Many of these technologies could be entirely susceptible to hacking, or other forms of interference, if adequate protections are not in place to ensure they are sourced from safe and reliable suppliers,” the senators wrote.