Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school

Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school
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A bipartisan group of senators on Thursday introduced legislation to increase cybersecurity training for U.S. high school students involved in the Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (JROTC) in an effort to increase overall cyber defense training.

The JROTC Cyber Training Act would direct the secretary of Defense to create a program to enhance the preparation of JROTC high school students for military or civilian careers in cybersecurity and computer science, including internship or research opportunities and funding for training.

The bill is sponsored by Sens. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Senators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Key endorsements: A who's who in early states MORE (D-Nev.), Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTaylor Swift defends staying out of the 2016 election: 'I just knew I wasn't going to help' The 23 Republicans who opposed Trump-backed budget deal Senate passes sweeping budget deal, sending it to Trump MORE (R-Tenn.), John CornynJohn CornynThe Hill's Campaign Report: Battle for Senate begins to take shape The Hill's Morning Report — Trump and the new Israel-'squad' controversy O'Rourke says he will not 'in any scenario' run for Senate MORE (R-Texas) and Gary PetersGary Charles PetersFBI Agents Association calls on Congress to make 'domestic terrorism' a federal crime Senators renew request for domestic threats documents from FBI, DOJ after shootings Overnight Defense: Dems talk Afghanistan, nukes at Detroit debate | Senate panel advances Hyten nomination | Iranian foreign minister hit with sanctions | Senate confirms UN ambassador MORE (D-Mich.).

According to Rosen’s office, the bill has the potential to bring computer science and cybersecurity training to 500,000 students nationwide at 3,400 schools with JROTC programs.

Rosen said in a statement that it is “pivotal that we take concrete steps to increase the number of individuals trained in the field of cybersecurity,” adding that she will “continue working on forward-thinking solutions” that bolster both national defense and cybersecurity training for the armed forces.

Blackburn noted that “by providing funding for high school training in areas such as computer science and cybersecurity, we can ensure that the next generation in uniform is prepared for the future of combat.”

Multiple education organizations have endorsed the bill, including The College Board, the Computer Science Teachers Organization, the National Girls Collaborative Project, and Code.org.

A companion bill was introduced in the House last month by Reps. Lizzie Fletcher (D-Texas), Conor Lamb (D-Pa.), Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopThe House Republicans and Democrats not seeking reelection in 2020 Texas GOP lawmaker Conaway announces retirement Texas GOP Rep. Conaway won't seek reelection: report MORE (R-Utah), Mike Waltz (R-Fla.) and Jackie SpeierKaren (Jackie) Lorraine Jacqueline SpeierEpstein death sparks questions for federal government Overnight Defense: Senate fails to override Trump veto on Saudi arms sales | Two US troops killed in Afghanistan | Senators tee up nominations, budget deal ahead of recess Democrats see window closing for impeachment MORE (D-Calif.). It has been referred to the House Armed Services Committee.