Lawmakers offer bill to shore up federal cybersecurity

Lawmakers offer bill to shore up federal cybersecurity
© Greg Nash

Reps. John RatcliffeJohn Lee RatcliffeWe've lost sight of the real scandal US attorney recommends moving forward with charges against McCabe after DOJ rejects his appeal Hillicon Valley: Google to pay 0M to settle child privacy charges against YouTube | Tech giants huddle with intel officials on election security | Top IT official names China main cyber threat MORE (R-Texas) and Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices | Trump says it's 'great to see' plan | Progressives pushing for changes Progressives push for changes to Pelosi drug pricing plan Khanna calls out progressives who haven't endorsed Lipinski challenger MORE (D-Calif.) will introduce a bill this week intended to modernize a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) program that ensures the cybersecurity of federal agencies. 

The Advancing Cybersecurity Diagnostics and Mitigation Act would formally codify the department's Continuous Diagnostics and Mitigation (CDM) program, which provides tools and services to federal agencies to increase cybersecurity. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The bill would also require DHS to develop a strategy to ensure that the CDM program is able to adjust to evolving cyber threats and would require the DHS secretary to make the CDM program available for state, local and tribal governments. 

The legislation is the House version of a Senate bill introduced in July by Sens. John CornynJohn CornynZuckerberg woos Washington critics during visit Paul objection snags confirmation of former McConnell staffer GOP signals unease with Barr's gun plan MORE (R-Texas) and Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanDemocrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Overnight Health Care: Juul's lobbying efforts fall short as Trump moves to ban flavored e-cigarettes | Facebook removes fact check from anti-abortion video after criticism | Poll: Most Democrats want presidential candidate who would build on ObamaCare Lawmakers weigh responses to rash of ransomware attacks MORE (D-N.H.), which has not yet seen action. It has been referred to the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. 

Ratcliffe, who was briefly nominated by President TrumpDonald John TrumpMarine unit in Florida reportedly pushing to hold annual ball at Trump property Giuliani clashes with CNN's Cuomo, calls him a 'sellout' and the 'enemy' Giuliani says 'of course' he asked Ukraine to look into Biden seconds after denying it MORE to be director of national intelligence in July, said in a statement that "as cyber threats continue to increase in frequency and complexity, we must constantly work to enhance our nation’s cyber defense capabilities."

Khanna added in a statement that “our government must have the necessary tools to protect Americans against the massive cybersecurity threats of the 21st century. The technology is there: we just have to ensure our agencies have the necessary tools to defend against hackers and cyberthreats. A strong CDM program will be instrumental in that effort."

Both Cornyn and Hassan expressed support for the upcoming introduction of the House version of the bill. 

Cornyn said in a statement that “by codifying the CDM program and providing congressional oversight, we can ensure the federal government is better prepared for cyber threats,” while Hassan noted that she “looks forward to continuing to work on a bipartisan basis across the House and Senate to move this bill forward.”