Lawyer says Assange tried to warn White House, Clinton about dump of diplomatic cables

Julian AssangeJulian Paul AssangeFBI releases documents showing Roger Stone, Julian Assange communications Judge orders Chelsea Manning's release from jail Lawyers: Chelsea Manning recovering after suicide attempt MORE's legal counsel argued in his London extradition hearing Tuesday that Assange tried to contact then-Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonNew FBI document confirms the Trump campaign was investigated without justification California 25 and COVID-19 The Memo: Trump tweets cross into new territory MORE after he realized that unredacted U.S. diplomatic documents were going to be leaked on the internet almost a decade ago.

Mark Summers, Assange's lawyer, told the London court that Assange called the State Department shortly before the documents were released in 2011 and said, "Unless we do something, people’s lives are put at risk."

According to Summers, the State Department directed Assange to call back “in a couple of hours," Reuters reports

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The U.S. is seeking to extradite the 48-year-old Assange on 18 counts of hacking U.S. government computers and an espionage offense. Assange allegedly worked with former U.S. soldier Chelsea ManningChelsea Elizabeth ManningOvernight Defense: National Guard activated to fight coronavirus | Pentagon 'fairly certain' North Korea has cases | General says Iran threat remains 'very high' after US strikes The Hill's Morning Report — Coronavirus tests a partisan Washington Judge orders Chelsea Manning's release from jail MORE — known then Bradley ManningChelsea Elizabeth ManningOvernight Defense: National Guard activated to fight coronavirus | Pentagon 'fairly certain' North Korea has cases | General says Iran threat remains 'very high' after US strikes The Hill's Morning Report — Coronavirus tests a partisan Washington Judge orders Chelsea Manning's release from jail MORE — to release 250,000 pages of classified communique. 

Summers described the allegations against Assange as “lies, lies and more lies."

The prosecution, representing the U.S., has argued that Assange's actions endangered personnel in Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan, according to the news service.

Last year, Washington requested that Assange be extradited after he was apprehended from the Ecuadorian Embassy in London. Assange spent the past seven years in the embassy, avoiding being returned to Sweden to face sex crime allegations that have since been dropped.

Assange was arrested by U.K. authorities after he skipped bail and has been held in custody pending the outcome of the trial.