Kony resolution catches on in Senate

Much like the viral video that reintroduced the world to the atrocities committed by Ugandan warlord Joseph Kony, a Senate resolution condemning his actions is rapidly gaining support on Capitol Hill.

Introduced by Sens. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsDems punch back over GOP holdup of Biden SBA nominee Biden threatens more sanctions on Ethiopia, Eritrea over Tigray conflict Senate Democrats to Garland: 'It's time to end the federal death penalty' MORE (D-Del.) and Jim InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeTop Republican: General told senators he opposed Afghanistan withdrawal Austin, Milley to testify on Afghanistan withdrawal The Pentagon budget is already out of control: Some in Congress want to make it worse MORE (R-Okla.), the resolution calls upon the Obama administration to increase assistance to the Ugandan militarys efforts to take out Kony and his Lords Resistance Army. 

ADVERTISEMENT

Lawmakers have been falling all over themselves to sign on as co-sponsors to the Coons-Inhofe resolution. By Thursday, 37 senators had signed on.

The list of co-sponsors includes Sens. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.), Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinOvernight Defense: First group of Afghan evacuees arrives in Virginia | Biden signs Capitol security funding bill, reimbursing Guard | Pentagon raises health protection level weeks after lowering it Biden pays tribute to late Sen. Levin: 'Embodied the best of who we are' Former Colorado Gov. Richard Lamm dead at 85 MORE (D-Mich.), John McCainJohn Sidney McCainWhoopi Goldberg signs four-year deal with ABC to stay on 'The View' Collins to endorse LePage in Maine governor comeback bid Meghan McCain: Country has not 'healed' from Trump under Biden MORE (R-Ariz.), Jack ReedJack ReedTop Republican: General told senators he opposed Afghanistan withdrawal We have a plan that prioritizes Afghanistan's women — we're just not using it This week: Democrats kick off chaotic fall with Biden's agenda at stake MORE (D-R.I.), Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinFederal watchdog calls on Congress, Energy Dept. to overhaul nuclear waste storage process Senate advances Biden consumer bureau pick after panel logjam Republicans caught in California's recall trap MORE (D-Calif.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamNorth Dakota Republican latest House breakthrough COVID-19 case Texas House Republican tests positive for coronavirus in latest breakthrough case Graham told Trump he 'f'd up' the presidency: book MORE (R-S.C.). 

The recent wave of attention on Kony and the LRA began weeks ago when the California-based nonprofit Invisible Children released the 30-minute Web video titled Kony 2012. 

The video highlighted the LRA’s practice of kidnapping children and forcing them to take up arms against Ugandan troops. The video metastasized into an Internet sensation, garnering millions of views and prompting a worldwide outcry against the LRA and its infamous leader. 

That outcry has now hit the halls of Capitol Hill. 

“Joseph Kony represents the worst of mankind, and he and his commanders must be held accountable for their war crimes, Coons wrote in the resolution.

“In order to combat terror and prevent further devastation caused by the hands of Joseph Kony, it is imperative that he is found and the LRA is finally disarmed. Only then, will we be able to bring stability to Africa. 

While the Kony 2012 video and subsequent public response has brought the LRA into the spotlight, the group has been active in Uganda, South Sudan and the Republic of Congo since the 1980s. 

Last October, the Obama administration approved sending 100 U.S. special operations troops into Uganda to help Ugandan forces go after Kony and the LRA. 

American special forces were not sent to engage LRA forces directly, but to provide logistics and intelligence support to the Ugandans, the Pentagon said at the time.