Holder defends independence of DOJ investigation into national-security leaks

Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderRosenstein fiasco raises the stakes in midterms for DOJ’s future Why must everything Rosenstein be filled with drama?   Dems fight to protect Mueller amid Rosenstein rumors MORE defended the Justice Department’s ability to be independent as it investigates national-security leaks in the face of Republican calls for a special counsel.

Holder said at a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing Tuesday that the two U.S. attorneys he appointed will “follow leads wherever they are, whether in the executive branch or other component of government."

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“This committee and the American people can have great faith in the two people I've asked to lead this investigation,” Holder said.

Many Republicans in the Senate have called for a special counsel to lead an investigation independent of the executive branch, and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainUpcoming Kavanaugh hearing: Truth or consequences How the Trump tax law passed: Dealing with a health care hangover Kavanaugh’s fate rests with Sen. Collins MORE (R-Ariz.) will introduce a non-binding resolution pressing for a special counsel on Tuesday.

“I believe the only way to truly get to the bottom of these dangerous leaks is to appoint an independent special prosecutor,” said Judiciary Committee ranking member Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyTrump: Dems playing destructive 'con game' with Kavanaugh Kavanaugh accuser Ramirez's attorney says Republicans were no-shows on scheduled call Grassley taps Arizona prosecutor Rachel Mitchell to question Kavanaugh, Ford MORE (R-Iowa).

Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamGOP divide in Congress over Rosenstein's future Sanders: Kavanaugh accusers 'have risked their lives to come forward' Rosenstein fiasco raises the stakes in midterms for DOJ’s future MORE (R-S.C.), who supports McCain's resolution, said, "If there was ever a need for an outside special counsel, it is now.”

But Intelligence Committee Chairwoman Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinKavanaugh accuser Ramirez's attorney says Republicans were no-shows on scheduled call Dem senators slam GOP for announcing Kavanaugh vote ahead of Ford testimony Grassley to Feinstein: We won't delay Kavanaugh hearing MORE (D-Calif.), who also sits on Judiciary, said Tuesday that she would oppose McCain’s resolution and did not believe a special counsel was necessary.

Feinstein’s statement highlights a division between Republicans and Democrats on the intelligence leak probe as both parties have tried to put forward a bipartisan approach to the leaks.

“To have a fight over how we do this now will set back any leak investigation,” Feinstein said. “These are two scrupulous men, they are both independent, and I have no reason to believe why they can’t work with the FBI and assemble a very strong prosecution team where warranted.”

Holder said that a special counsel would take too much time to set up, and that appointing two U.S. attorneys, Maryland’s Rod Rosenstein and D.C.’s Ronald Machen Jr., was the best course.

“The need is for us to operate with some degree of haste and speed,” Holder said. “That’s why I picked two really good U.S. attorneys.”