GOP senator presses for hearing on Chattanooga shooting

Sen. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeOn The Money: Trump to sign border deal, declare emergency to build wall | Senate passes funding bill, House to follow | Dems promise challenge to emergency declaration Trump to sign border deal, declare national emergency Foreign Affairs chairman: US military intervention in Venezuela 'not an option' MORE (R-Okla.) is asking the leaders of the Senate Armed Services to look into the Pentagon’s effort to increase security at military installations following last week’s deadly shooting in Chattanooga, Tennessee. 

The shooting that killed four Marines and one sailor “again raised great concerns with me about the security of our service members in and out of uniform, civilian employees, and their dependents,” Inhofe said Monday in a letter to Armed Services chairman John McCainJohn Sidney McCainPence met with silence after mentioning Trump in Munich speech Mark Kelly's campaign raises over M in days after launching Senate bid The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by Kidney Care Partners — Lawmakers wait for Trump's next move on border deal MORE (R-Ariz.) and Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedPapering over climate change impacts is indefensible Why Democrats are pushing for a new nuclear policy GOP chairman: US military may have to intervene in Venezuela if Russia does MORE (R.I.), the panel’s top Democrat.

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Inhofe, himself a member of the powerful committee, asked the pair to “schedule a hearing as soon as possible on the efforts the Department of Defense (DOD) is reviewing and/or taking regarding force protection of its service members and their families.” 

Last Thursday, Mohammad Youssuf Abdulazeez, a 24-year-old Kuwaiti-born citizen, opened fire at a Navy recruiting center in Chattanooga and then at a Navy and Marines Reserve Center, according to law enforcement.

The rampage sparked a quick response from Capitol Hill lawmakers with McCain and House Armed Services Committee chairman Mac Thornberry (R-Texas) declaring that the defense policy bill they are currently working on would direct the Pentagon to "end the disconnect between the threats our warfighters face and their families face and the tools they have to defend themselves."

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzPoll shows competitive matchup if O’Rourke ran for Senate again Democrats veer left as Trump cements hold on Republicans O’Rourke heading to Wisconsin amid 2020 speculation MORE (R-Texas), a 2016 presidential contender and a member of the Armed Services panel, also called for hearings on allowing troops to carry arms in military facilities, a cause he has taken up in the past.

"We can immediately hold hearings in the Senate Armed Services Committee on the need for our enlisted men and women to have the right to be armed in military facilities," he said.

Sen. Ron JohnsonRonald (Ron) Harold JohnsonGOP senator voices concern about Trump order, hasn't decided whether he'll back it GOP braces for Trump's emergency declaration GOP wants to pit Ocasio-Cortez against Democrats in the Senate MORE (R-Wis.), chairman of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, said he would offer legislation to get rid of regulations prohibiting troops from carrying firearms on military installations.

Meanwhile, a number of governors have authorized National Guard personnel in their state to be armed following last week’s attack.

“During a time when our nation is at war, I believe it is in the best interest of our military members to assess their protection while on duty, even on the homefront,” Inhofe said.