'Reasonable chance' DOD can duck sequester, says Pentagon budget chief

"I definitely hope sequestration won't happen, and I still believe there's a reasonable chance it will not," DOD comptroller Robert Hale said Tuesday during a speech in Arlington, Va. 

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His comments echo those made by Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Carl LevinCarl Milton LevinListen, learn and lead: Congressional newcomers should leave the extremist tactics at home House Democrats poised to set a dangerous precedent with president’s tax returns The Hill's 12:30 Report — Sponsored by Delta Air Lines — White House to 'temporarily reinstate' Acosta's press pass after judge issues order | Graham to take over Judiciary panel | Hand recount for Florida Senate race MORE (D-Mich.) earlier this month. 

“One way or another, since 90 percent of us don’t want it, it will not happen,” Levin told reporters on Capitol Hill. “My hope is it will not happen early enough to avoid any kind of instability or upset or uncertainty," he added. 

The Pentagon is facing a roughly $500 billion across-the-board budget cut under the White House's sequestration plan. The cuts were triggered by lawmakers failure last summer to come to an agreement on a deal to raise the debt ceiling but cut spending. Another nearly $500 billion in cuts will come from non-defense spending. 

With just over three months until the cuts go into place, lawmakers still have yet to come up with a viable alternative to avoid the funding reductions. 

But according to Hale, there is still hope inside the Pentagon that Congress can forge a alternate plan. 

Hale's optimism belies the severe partisan divide on Capitol Hill over dealing with the automatic cuts. 

Congressional Democrats have argued for months that tax increases must be considered as part of a replacement plan. Republicans in both chambers, however, have shunned including any tax hikes. 

GOP leaders on Capitol Hill argue the planned defense cuts should be replaced with additional cuts to social welfare programs. 

Such partisan bickering has put the Pentagon and the rest of the government on a collision course with a harsh fiscal future, Hale told lawmakers last Thursday. 

“If you're driving into a brick wall at 60 miles an hour, let's find a way to avoid the wall, not figure out a way to pick up the pieces after we hit it,” Hale told members of the House Armed Services Committee.

Hale was responding to committee comments suggesting sequestration could be manageable, if DOD is allowed to weigh in on which areas of the defense budget the reductions would come from. 

“We need to halt [sequestration], rather than try to make it better, because we're not going to be able to make it fundamentally better," he added. 

On Monday, group of Democratic and Republican senators sent a letter to their party's respective leaders pleading for a bipartisan solution to sequestration. 

In the letter to Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidNo, it is not racist to question birthright citizenship McConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster Harry Reid: 'Decriminalizing border crossings is not something that should be at the top of the list' MORE (D-Nev.) and Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats press FBI, DHS on response to white supremacist violence The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democratic field narrows with Inslee exit McConnell rejects Democrats' 'radical movement' to abolish filibuster MORE (R-Ky.), the lawmakers also reiterated their commitment to forging an alternative sequestration plan. 

"We are committed to working together to help forge a balanced bipartisan deficit reduction package to avoid damage to our national security, important domestic priorities, and our economy," wrote Levin and Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainCindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death Anti-gun violence organization endorses Kelly's Senate bid McCain's family, McCain Institute to promote #ActsOfCivility in marking first anniversary of senator's death MORE (R-Ariz.), the ranking member on Armed Services. 

Panel members Sens. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamWhite House won't move forward with billions in foreign aid cuts GOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads Cindy McCain says no one in Republican Party carries 'voice of reason' after husband's death MORE (R-S.C.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSunday shows - Recession fears dominate Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' Lewandowski says he's 'happy' to testify before House panel MORE (D-N.H.), Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseSenate Democrats push Trump to permanently shutter migrant detention facility To cash in on innovation, remove market barriers for advanced energy technologies Democrats give cold shoulder to Warren wealth tax MORE (D-R.I.) and Kelly AyotteKelly Ann AyotteTrump makes rare trip to Clinton state, hoping to win back New Hampshire Key endorsements: A who's who in early states Sinema, Gallagher fastest lawmakers in charity race MORE (R-N.H.) also signed the letter. 

On Tuesday, Levin declined to comment on the letter or whether he still believes Congress can reach a solution on sequestration before time runs out on Capitol Hill. 

The Michigan Democrat told The Hill through a spokesman that the language in the letter urging a bipartisan solution should speak for itself. 

—Jeremy Herb contributed to this report.