More than 100 lawmakers call on Trump to designate climate change a security threat

More than 100 lawmakers call on Trump to designate climate change a security threat
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A bipartisan group of more than 100 House lawmakers are urging President TrumpDonald John TrumpSanders apologizes to Biden for supporter's op-ed Jayapal: 'We will end up with another Trump' if the US doesn't elect progressive Democrats: McConnell impeachment trial rules a 'cover up,' 'national disgrace' MORE to name climate change a major security threat after he declined to include it in the administration’s  national security strategy.

In a letter sent to the White House Thursday, 106 members, including 11 Republicans, implore Trump to “reconsider this omission.”

“We have heard from scientists, military leaders, and civil personnel who believe that climate change is indeed a direct threat to America’s national security and to the stability of the world at large,” write Reps. Jim LangevinJames (Jim) R. LangevinLawmakers push back at Pentagon's possible Africa drawdown Hillicon Valley: DHS warns of Iranian cyber threats | YouTube updates child content policy | California privacy law takes effect | Tech, cyber issues to watch in 2020 Lawmakers close to finalizing federal strategy to defend against cyberattacks MORE (D-R.I.) and Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWhite House appoints GOP House members to advise Trump's impeachment team Lawmakers push back at Pentagon's possible Africa drawdown Overnight Energy: Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel | GOP lawmakers push back on bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners | Green groups sue Trump over California fracking plans MORE (R-N.Y.), who co-authored the letter.

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“As global temperatures become more volatile, sea levels rise, and landscapes change, our military installations and our communities are increasingly at risk of devastation. It is imperative that the United States address this growing geopolitical threat.”

The letter goes on to quote Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisLawmakers push back at Pentagon's possible Africa drawdown Overnight Defense: Book says Trump called military leaders 'dopes and babies' | House reinvites Pompeo for Iran hearing | Dems urge Esper to reject border wall funding request Trump called top military brass 'a bunch of dopes and babies' in 2017: book MORE, who said in his confirmation hearing that “the effects of a changing climate ... will impact our security situation.”

Lawmakers even included such warnings in the fiscal 2018 National Defense Authorization Act, calling climate change “a direct threat to the national security of the United States.” Trump signed the NDAA into law in December.

Leaving out climate change breaks with the Obama administration, which last year said it considers climate change a national security threat.

“Failing to recognize this threat in your National Security Strategy represents a significant step backwards on this issue and discredits those who deal in scientific fact,” the letter states.

Langevin in July offered an amendment to the NDAA that would require the Pentagon to conduct a study on the impact of climate change on U.S. military installations and to report to Congress the installations most vulnerable to a changing climate. 

The language made it in to the final bill, and requires Mattis to submit to Congress “a report on the vulnerability to military installations and combatant commander requirements resulting from climate change over the next 20 years.”

But Deputy Defense Secretary Patrick Shanahan said last month that the National Defense Strategy, which marks the direction and priorities for the Pentagon, will not mention climate change.

“We don't specifically address climate change. ... There is only so much, you know, depth and breadth. ... It really reflects the high priorities of the department,” Shanahan told reporters at the Pentagon.