Mattis vows 'Dreamers' serving in military will not be deported

Mattis vows 'Dreamers' serving in military will not be deported
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Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisOvernight Defense — Presented by Raytheon — Trump takes tough line on Iran at UN | Boasts about record spark laughter | Pentagon in 5G race with China | GOP chair urges Trump to keep Mattis Armed Services chairman to Trump: Keep Mattis 'as long as you possibly can' Admiral defends record after coming under investigation in 'Fat Leonard' scandal MORE said Thursday that “Dreamers” serving in the military will not be deported, even if the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program expires.

“We would always stand by one of our people,” Mattis told reporters at the Pentagon.

Matts said the protections apply to those who benefit from the program who are on active duty, in the active reserves, have already signed a contract with the military and are waiting to go to boot camp and veterans who left with an honorable discharge.

“They will not be subject to any kind of deportation,” he said.

There are two exceptions to the protection, Mattis noted: If someone has committed a serious felony, or if a federal judge has signed a final deportation order.

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“That would be a judicial action that obviously we obey in the court system. We don’t have veto authority over a court,” Mattis said of the latter.

Mattis also said he spoke with Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen NielsenKirstjen Michele NielsenWatchdog finds FEMA chief cost government 1K on unauthorized travel: report Webb: The new mob: Anti-American Dems DOJ employee in Project Veritas video says she was fired for confronting Kirstjen Nielsen at restaurant MORE earlier in the day to confirm the protections.

“We have been through this in great detail before … so it’s really just a confirming call,” he said.

The Trump administration announced last year it was rescinding DACA, an Obama-era program that allows certain immigrants brought into the country illegally as children to live and work in the U.S. without fear of deportation. It also allows them to serve in the military.

About 900 DACA recipients are now enrolled in the armed forces or are awaiting boot camp, according to chief Pentagon spokeswoman Dana White.

The program is set to expire March 5, and is a linchpin of ongoing immigration negotiations in Congress.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnell GOP leaning toward Arizona sex crimes prosecutor to question Kavanaugh accuser: report GOP confidence grows on Kavanaugh Senate panel schedules Friday morning vote for Kavanaugh MORE (R-Ky.) has said he will bring an immigration bill to the Senate floor, and House Democrats are pressuring Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanHow the Trump tax law passed: Dealing with a health care hangover Dems fight to protect Mueller amid Rosenstein rumors Jordan wants Rosenstein to testify before House Judiciary Committee MORE (R-Wis.) to agree to do the same.

House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHillicon Valley: State officials share tech privacy concerns with Sessions | Senator says election security bill won't pass before midterms | Instagram co-founders leave Facebook | Google chief to meet GOP lawmakers over bias claims Collins defends ad showing opponent speaking Korean against claims of bigotry Hoyer questions feasibility of new threshold for Speaker nomination MORE (D-Calif.) on Wednesday delivered an eight-hour speech in support of DACA, and said she will oppose a spending bill because it does not include an immigration fix.

—Updated at 6:52 p.m.