House passes $675B Pentagon spending bill

House passes $675B Pentagon spending bill
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The House on Thursday advanced a $675 billion Defense Department spending bill for fiscal 2019.

Lawmakers voted 359 to 49 to approve the bill, which would provide $606.5 billion in base discretionary funding and $68.1 billion for a war fund known as the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account.

One additional amendment to the bill was adopted before the final vote, Rep. Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkTen notable Democrats who do not favor impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Trump searches for backstops amid recession worries Fourth-ranking House Democrat backs Trump impeachment MORE’s (D-Mass.) provision to move $14 million to support Pentagon innovation.

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Four other amendments were shot down, including two from Rep Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John Gallagher2020 Democrats raise alarm about China's intellectual property theft Bipartisan panel to issue recommendations for defending US against cyberattacks early next year Overnight Defense: House votes to block Trump arms sales to Saudis, setting up likely veto | US officially kicks Turkey out of F-35 program | Pentagon sending 2,100 more troops to border MORE (R-Wis.) -- one to increase Air Force buys of the Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM) by $33 million, the other to boost Navy AMRAAM procurement by $24 million.

An amendment offered by Rep. Bill FosterGeorge (Bill) William FosterHouse Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment The Hill's Morning Report - Dem lawmakers put guns, hate groups on fall agenda House Democrat offers bill to let students with pot conviction retain federal aid MORE (D-Ill.) to block dollars meant to develop a space-based missile defense layer also failed.

The most anticipated amendment, a proposal to free up $1 billion to speed up buys of the Navy’s Virginia-class submarine, lost big in a 144 to 267 vote. That amendment was offered by Reps. Rob WittmanRobert (Rob) Joseph WittmanVirginia Port: Gateway to the economic growth Republican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland MORE (R-Va.), and Joe CourtneyJoseph (Joe) D. CourtneyHouse committee heads demand Coast Guard Academy explain handling of harassment allegations House votes to repeal ObamaCare's 'Cadillac tax' Overnight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One MORE (D-Conn.), the chairman and ranking member of the Armed Services seapower subcommittee, whose states house shipyards that build the subs.

Deputy Defense Secretary Pat Shanahan had pushed back on that proposal in a letter to House appropriators on Monday.

Such a move, Shanahan argued, would require the Navy over several years to take $6 billion dollars away from other vital shipbuilding programs.

The House defense spending bill now must be reconciled with the Senate’s version, which was advanced by the Senate Appropriations Committee on Thursday. The measure will be taken up after the July 4th break.

The House’s budget amount includes a 15,600 troop increase across the military, and a 2.6 percent pay raise for service members beginning in January.

In addition, the bill would provide $9.4 billion for 93 F-35 fighter jets - 16 more jets than the administration requested and four more than Senate appropriators want – as well as $22.7 billion for 12 new Navy ships, and $145.7 billion for equipment purchases and upgrades.

House lawmakers had inserted several amendments into the bill leading up to the vote, including a provision to add $10 million to aid in bringing Korea War remains from North Korea to the United States, and a proposal to block the Pentagon from business with Chinese telecom companies ZTE and Huawei.

The House last month approved a similar provision to the ZTE amendment in its fiscal 2019 National Defense Authorization Act, and the Pentagon already bans the ZTE and Huawei products from its base stores.