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Dems plan resolution to withdraw US forces from Yemen civil war

Dems plan resolution to withdraw US forces from Yemen civil war
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A group of House Democrats wants to force a vote to withdraw U.S. forces from the civil war in Yemen, the lawmakers announced on Thursday.

They said that they will introduce a so-called privileged resolution this month if the situation in the war-battered country does not improve that would withdraw the U.S. military from helping the Saudi Arabia-led coalition fighting Yemeni rebels.

“We are preparing to introduce a new, privileged resolution in September invoking the War Powers Resolution of 1973 to withdraw U.S. Armed Forces from engaging in the Saudi-led coalition’s conflict with the Houthis should additional escalations continue and progress fail to be made towards a peace agreement,” the lawmakers said in a joint statement.

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“There has been no specific authorization for the U.S. Armed Forces to engage in hostilities with respect to the conflict between the Saudi-led coalition and the Houthis in Yemen. We must take action to end U.S. participation in this catastrophic war in Yemen and work to bring about a peaceful conclusion to this conflict.”

The effort is being led by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaDemocrats shift tone on unemployment benefits Khanna outlines how progressives will push in climate infrastructure proposal Fresh hurdles push timeline on getting China bill to Biden MORE (D-Calif.), who previously led the charge for a House-passed nonbinding resolution that called U.S. military involvement in the war unauthorized.

The statement was co-signed by Rep. Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithThe tale of the last bipartisan unicorns Congress must stop the march toward war with China Pelosi floats Democrat-led investigation of Jan. 6 as commission alternative MORE (D-Wash.), the ranking member of the House Armed Services Committee; Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanThe Memo: The pre-Trump 'normal' is gone for good Overnight Defense: Pentagon pitches 5B budget | Kamala Harris addresses US Naval Academy graduates Pentagon pitches 5B budget with cuts to older weapons MORE (D-Wis.), a co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus; and Democratic Reps. Jim McGovern (Mass.), Jan SchakowskyJanice (Jan) Danoff SchakowskyOnline school raises new concerns about cyberbullying Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill Battle lines drawn over Biden's support for vaccine waivers MORE (Ill.), Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard on Chicago mayor's decision to limit media interviews to people of color: 'Anti-white racism' Fox News says network and anchor Leland Vittert have 'parted ways' New co-chairs named for congressional caucus for millennials MORE (Hawaii), Michael CapuanoMichael (Mike) Everett CapuanoBottom line Hillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy MORE (Mass.), Yvette ClarkeYvette Diane ClarkeTSA working on additional pipeline security regulations following Colonial Pipeline hack School districts struggle to defend against rising ransomware attacks Hillicon Valley: Democrats urge Facebook to abandon 'Instagram for kids' plan | 'Homework gap' likely to persist after pandemic MORE (N.Y.), Ted Lieu (Calif.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeOvernight Defense: House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq war powers | Pentagon leaders press senators to reimburse National Guard | New pressure on US-Iran nuclear talks House votes to repeal 2002 Iraq war powers Overnight Defense: Biden, Putin agree to launch arms control talks at summit | 2002 war authorization repeal will get Senate vote | GOP rep warns Biden 'blood with be on his hands' without Afghan interpreter evacuation MORE (Calif.) and Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralThe Memo: Harris, Ocasio-Cortez and the Democratic divide on immigration House Democrats introduce bill to close existing gun loopholes and prevent mass shootings Hispanic Caucus energized by first Biden meeting MORE (N.Y.).

The lawmakers announced their plans on the same day the United Nations’ special envoy for Yemen is convening the first formal peace talks in the war in two years.

Yemen’s civil war has raged since 2015, when Iran-backed Houthi rebels took over the capital of Sanaa. Saudi Arabia, concerned about Iran’s link to rebels near its border, intervened on behalf of the internationally recognized Yemeni government.

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The United States does not actively fight in the war, but it supports the coalition with aerial refueling, intelligence sharing and billions of dollars in weapons sales.

U.S. lawmakers’ patience with the Saudi coalition has been wearing increasingly thin as the civilian death toll mounts. The United Nations pegs the civilian death toll at 6,660 as of Aug. 23, a number that is largely blamed on coalition air strikes.

“It’s critical that the United States not choose sides in this war, and any American involvement can and must be debated transparently,” the Democrats said Thursday. “For every Yemeni civilian killed in an airstrike, countless more perish from hunger and disease triggered and sustained by the war. The Saudi-led coalition, and all parties involved, must be held accountable for their actions contributing to this ongoing crisis.”

A United Nations report last month said all parties in the conflict may be responsible for war crimes.

Last month, the coalition struck a school bus, killing 40 children. The incident prompted the rare admission from the coalition that the strike was “unjustified.”

The State Department said this week that Saudi Arabia’s admission was an "important first step toward full transparency and accountability" while reiterating it “fully supports” U.N. Special Envoy for Yemen Martin Griffiths's efforts to end the war.

As part of the annual defense policy bill signed into law last month, Congress is requiring the administration to certify by Sept. 12 that Saudi and Emirati behavior is helping to end the war, alleviate the humanitarian crisis and protect civilians. If the administration cannot make the certification, it must stop refueling coalition aircraft.

The law allows for a national security waiver to keep refueling aircraft if the certification can’t be made, but the administration still has to submit an unclassified justification to Congress if it grants the waiver.

“As the U.N. attempts to broker a ceasefire, it is imperative that the Saudi-led coalition halt fresh hostilities and planned offensives, particularly in and around the vital port city of Hodeidah,” the Democrats said in their statement Thursday. “We are closely monitoring the actions of the Saudi-led coalition and the White House during these crucial peace negotiations.”