Bipartisan senators reintroduce bill to prevent Trump from withdrawing from NATO

Bipartisan senators reintroduce bill to prevent Trump from withdrawing from NATO
© Greg Nash

A bipartisan group of senators on Thursday reintroduced a bill that would prevent the president from withdrawing from the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) without Senate approval.

The bill, introduced by four Democrats and four Republicans, would require two-thirds approval from the Senate for a president to suspend, terminate or withdraw the United States from NATO.

President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump endorses former White House physician Ronny Jackson for Congress Newly released emails reveal officials' panic over loss of credibility after Trump's Dorian claims Lindsey Graham thanks Trump, bemoans 'never-ending bull----' at South Carolina rally  MORE’s repeated threats to withdraw from NATO are dangerous,” Sen. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineThe Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to South Carolina to turn around campaign How to avert the direct care workforce shortage The Hill's 12:30 Report: Crunch time for Dems ahead of South Carolina, Super Tuesday MORE (D-Va.) said in a statement announcing the bill’s reintroduction. “Our NATO allies have fought alongside our troops since World War II, yet President Trump disparages these nations and cozies up to our adversaries.”

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The other co-sponsors are Sens. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump on US coronavirus risks: 'We're very, very ready for this' GOP, Democrats hash out 2020 strategy at dueling retreats The Hill's Morning Report - Can Sanders be stopped? MORE (R-Colo.), Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedBipartisan senators say Pentagon's effort to improve military housing falls short Overnight Defense: Lawmakers tear into Pentagon over .8B for border wall | Dems offer bill to reverse Trump on wall funding | Senators urge UN to restore Iran sanctions Democrats introduce bill to reverse Trump's shift of military money toward wall MORE (D-R.I.), Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamMSNBC's Chris Matthews confuses South Carolina Democratic Senate candidate with GOP's Tim Scott Lindsey Graham thanks Trump, bemoans 'never-ending bull----' at South Carolina rally  The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Washington, Wall Street on edge about coronavirus MORE (R-S.C.), Chris CoonsChristopher (Chris) Andrew CoonsTim Kaine endorses Joe Biden ahead of Super Tuesday Democratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe Graham warned Pentagon chief about consequences of Africa policy: report MORE (D-Del.), Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioHome state candidates risk losing primaries The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Trump on US coronavirus risks: 'We're very, very ready for this' Overnight Energy: Critics pile on Trump plan to roll back major environmental law | Pick for Interior No. 2 official confirmed | JPMorgan Chase to stop loans for fossil fuel drilling in the Arctic MORE (R-Fla.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) and Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsSchumer urges GOP to oppose Trump's intel pick Education Department changing eligibility for hundreds of rural school districts receiving aid: report Experts sound alarm over online scams against the elderly MORE (R-Maine).

The same bill was introduced last year after Trump rattled NATO allies at a July summit in Brussels. The sponsors last time were Kaine, Gardner, Reed and the late Sen. John McCainJohn Sidney McCainFox's Britt McHenry confirms brain tumor, says she's got 'amazing medical team' President Trump is weak against Bernie Sanders in foreign affairs Appeals court refuses to throw out Joe Arpaio's guilty verdict after Trump pardon MORE (R-Ariz.).

The reintroduction comes after a New York Times report that Trump told aides several times last year that he wants to withdraw from NATO.

One of the occasions when Trump reportedly raised the issue of withdrawal was the lead-up to the NATO summit in July, when he told his top national security officials he did not see the point of the alliance and thought it was a drain on the United States.

Right now, presidents are required to get the consent of the Senate to enter into treaties. Article 13 of the NATO treaty requires a country give a one-year "notice of denunciation" before it can exit NATO.

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In addition to requiring Senate approval for Trump to withdraw, the bill reintroduced Thursday would authorize the Senate Legal Counsel and the General Counsel of the House to challenge in court any attempt by the administration to withdraw from NATO without the Senate's consent.

In statements touting the resolution, the co-sponsors stressed the importance of a strong NATO alliance.

“NATO is more important than ever with Russia’s growing subversive activities in the region and beyond,” Rubio said. “It is critical to our national security and the security of our allies in Europe that the United States remain engaged and play an active role in NATO.”