Lawmakers urge Trump not to veto Yemen resolution

A bipartisan group of lawmakers in both the House and Senate are requesting a meeting with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump denies telling Bolton Ukraine aid was tied to investigations Former senior Senate GOP aide says Republicans should call witnesses Title, release date revealed for Bolton memoir MORE to urge him not to veto their bill cutting off U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen’s civil war.

“We believe that by signing this historic legislation to terminate an unconstitutional war that predates your presidency, you will set a new precedent for cooperation with both chambers of Congress to overcome such entrenched opposition to foreign-policy restraint,” the nine lawmakers wrote to Trump in a letter released Friday.

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“We respectfully ask for a meeting with you at your earliest convenience to discuss this legislation and the promising opportunities that can emerge from its passage.”

The letter was organized by Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaWarren calls for Brazil to drop charges against Glenn Greenwald Sanders co-chair: Greenwald charges could cause 'chilling effect on journalism across the world' The Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clash over rules MORE (D-Calif.), the lead sponsor of the resolution in the House. Its co-signers include GOP Trump allies such as Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzGaetz in Twitter battle with Florida House Republican Apple under pressure to unlock Pensacola shooter's phones Conservatives slam Warren's call to put transgender women in women's prisons MORE (Fla.) and Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulLindsey Graham will oppose subpoena of Hunter Biden Marsha Blackburn shares what book she's reading during Trump Senate trial Sekulow indicates Trump should not attend impeachment trial MORE (Ky.).

The letter, which is dated Thursday, comes after the House sent Trump the resolution in a 247-175 vote.

The resolution would require Trump to withdraw U.S. troops in or “affecting” Yemen unless they are fighting al Qaeda or associated forces.

The White House threatened to veto the resolution, saying in a statement that it raises “serious constitutional concerns” and is based on an “erroneous premise.”

Neither chamber of Congress passed the measure with enough support to override a veto.

But supporters are still holding out hope Trump will sign the resolution.

In the letter, the lawmakers appeal to Trump’s distaste for U.S. military entanglements abroad, saying they hope the resolution can be a “springboard to achieve our shared interest in responsibly drawing down needless conflicts throughout the world, such as ongoing U.S. military interventions in Afghanistan and Syria.”

“Both during your campaign and presidency, you have spoken out against a bipartisan tendency to be drawn into costly and never-ending conflicts across the globe and its devastating impacts for American service members and taxpayers,” they wrote. “You have also expressed public frustration over the resistance by some of your subordinates within the Executive Branch to your efforts to challenge this consensus.”

The letter also appears to appeal to Trump’s desire to deviate from former President Obama's policies, making several references to the fact that U.S. support for the Saudi-led campaign began during the Obama administration.

And the lawmakers note the resolution would have “no bearing on U.S. weapons sales to the Saudi kingdom.” Trump has touted a $110 billion arms deal with the Saudis as a signature achievement.