House panel votes to restrict possible changes to Air Force One design

The House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday voted to require congressional approval for changes to the Air Force One presidential aircraft’s paint scheme and interior design that have been cheered by President TrumpDonald John TrumpGOP senator introduces bill to hold online platforms liable for political bias Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally Rubio responds to journalist who called it 'strange' to see him at Trump rally MORE.

The amendment was approved 31-26 during the panel’s markup of the fiscal 2020 National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA).

Offered by Rep. Joe CourtneyJoseph (Joe) D. CourtneyOvernight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One Trump shares renderings of red, white and blue Air Force One Trump shares renderings of red, white and blue Air Force One MORE (D-Conn.), the chairman of the panel's seapower subcommittee, the amendment would require the Trump administration to OK with Congress any “work relating to aircraft paint scheme, interiors and livery” before it takes place.

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Courtney said his provision refers to the Air Force One replacement contract, a $3.9 billion, fixed-price deal the Air Force signed with Boeing in July 2018 to design, modify, test, certify and deliver two 747 planes by the end of 2024.

He argued that the contract has language that allows the fixed price to be “almost rendered moot in terms of just additional add-ons” and that his provision would help prevent any cost overruns on “less essential items regarding the paint and interior decorating” of the plane.

“Additional paint can add weight to the plane, additional fixtures inside the plane can also add cost and delays to the delivery of the plane,” Courtney said in presenting his amendment.

Trump has said he hopes to change the paint job on new Air Force Ones, forgoing the blue-and-white scheme — designed by President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jackie Kennedy — for a red, white and blue color scheme.

Trump told CBS News anchor Jeff Glor in July 2018 that the redesigned aircraft is “going to be the top of the line, the top in the world, and it’s going to be red, white and blue. Which I think is appropriate.”

“I said, ‘I wonder if we should use the same baby blue colors.’ And we’re not,” the president said.

But Courtney warned that even seemingly small changes to the plane can quickly add up.  

He pointed to a now-rescinded no-bid contract given to Boeing for nearly $25 million to replace the refrigeration system for the existing fleet of two Air Force Ones, “even though, by the time that would be installed, the shelf life of those planes would be about three to four years.”

Lawmakers had asked then-Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson to look into the matter, and she shortly thereafter canceled the deal.   

“As we saw with the refrigeration, this is not just speculation, this is actually a trend that we unfortunately have to keep an eye on,” Courtney said.

Rep. Bradley ByrneBradley Roberts ByrneRoy Moore to announce Thursday if he will run for Senate again Roy Moore to announce Thursday if he will run for Senate again Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland MORE (R-Ala.) opposed the amendment, saying it “looks like an attempt to just poke at the president.”

Rep. John GaramendiJohn Raymond GaramendiHouse panel shoots down funding, deployment of low-yield nukes in defense bill House panel shoots down funding, deployment of low-yield nukes in defense bill Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland MORE (D-Calif.), meanwhile, argued that if Trump wants to change “iconic” look of Air Force One, Congress “ought to have a say about it.”

“Personally I think we ought to stay with what we have. ... If somebody wants [fixtures] to be gold plated, come back here and tell us why it ought to be that way," Garamendi said.

Seapower subcommittee ranking member Rob WittmanRobert (Rob) Joseph WittmanOvernight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland Overnight Defense: Latest on House defense bill markup | Air Force One, low-yield nukes spark debate | House Dems introduce resolutions blocking Saudi arms sales | Trump to send 1,000 troops to Poland House panel votes to restrict possible changes to Air Force One design MORE (R-Va.) offered his own amendment to strike Courtney’s language from the NDAA, arguing such cost controls were already in place, but that provision was voted down.

Courtney pressed that Congress is “not handcuffing the Air Force and Boeing into exactly the same version of the plane that was the Air Force one that is being replaced. There is some flexibility in there in terms of making some modifications, but ... that does not require over and above spending.”

A final decision on the planes’ paint color and design isn’t due until 2021, making it possible that it won’t be changed if Trump fails to win reelection next year.

Should Trump win another term, he may or may not fly on the finished aircraft. The Air Force currently slates the first plane to be finished by September 2024, though major military projects such as this tend to go past the scheduled end date.

Armed Services Chairman Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithOvernight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One House panel approves 3B defense policy bill House panel approves 3B defense policy bill MORE (D-Wash.) said the included amendment is “really not trying to poke the president” but “simply trying to exercise our oversight responsibilities to try to save the taxpayers money.”

“As I understand it these planes are not even going to be delivered until late 2024, 2025. This president is not going to fly on this plane under any circumstances,” Smith said.

– This story was updated June 13 at 6:11 p.m. to correct the type of new contracted aircraft