Buttigieg: We don't know what allies Trump 'will have pissed off worst'

Buttigieg: We don't know what allies Trump 'will have pissed off worst'
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South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegSunday shows preview: Trump ratchets up trade war with China Democratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows Steyer calls on DNC to expand polling criteria for debates MORE said the U.S. relationship with “the entire world” will need to change following President TrumpDonald John TrumpGraham: America must 'accept the pain that comes in standing up to China' Weld 'thrilled' more Republicans are challenging Trump New data challenges Trump's economic narrative MORE’s tenure.

“We have no idea which of our most important allies he will have pissed off worst between now and then,” Buttigieg quipped Thursday during the Democratic presidential primary debate. “What we know is that our relationship with the entire world needs to change. It starts by modeling American values at home.”

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Buttigieg was responding to a question posed to all 10 candidates on stage about which U.S. relationship they would repair first if elected, one of the few foreign policy questions in the two-hour debate.

Trump has disparaged U.S. allies throughout his tenure, such as demanding NATO members pay more for the price of their own defense.

Several candidates on Thursday cited NATO as the issue they would focus on first, including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenScaramucci attends charity event featuring Biden in the Hamptons Klobuchar knocks Trump: 'This negotiating by tweet hasn't been working' Rendell: Biden 'baked in' as Democratic nominee MORE, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisSanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Obama reveals his summer playlist Democratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows MORE (D-Calif.) and Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellIf the Democratic debates were pro wrestling, de Blasio is comic relief Inslee seeking third term as governor after ending presidential bid The Hill's Morning Report - Trump touts new immigration policy, backtracks on tax cuts MORE (D-Calif.).

“We know NATO will fall apart if [Trump is] elected four more years,” Biden said. 

Author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson on Trump: We have a little bit of a 'mad King George' in charge Democratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch MORE said she would call up European leaders and tell them, “We’re back.”

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetSanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Democratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch MORE (D-Colo.) also said he would repair relationships with European allies, as well as Latin American countries “willing to have a conversation about how to deal with the refugee crisis.”

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandDemocratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows The Hill's Campaign Report: Democratic field begins to shrink ahead of critical stretch Gabbard, Steyer inch toward making third Democratic debate MORE (D-N.Y.) highlighted Iran, saying Trump is “hell-bent” on starting a war there and that she would make sure “we do not start an unwanted, never-ending war.”

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersTrump preps conspiracy theory to explain faltering economy Sanders doubles down on 'Medicare For All' defense: 'We have not changed one word' Sanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses MORE (I-Vt.) said he would “rebuild trust in the entire United Nations.”

Former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperDemocratic candidates face hard choices as 2020 field winnows If the Democratic debates were pro wrestling, de Blasio is comic relief Hickenlooper day-old Senate bid faces pushback from progressives MORE and tech entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangSanders, Warren back major shift to fight drug overdoses Obama reveals his summer playlist Surprise: Andrew Yang's favorite president is a Republican MORE both said China, with Yang adding Beijing will be important to work with on climate change, artificial intelligence and North Korea.

In one of the other few foreign policy questions, Biden also defended his record of voting for the Iraq War, highlighting that the Obama administration withdrew troops from Iraq.

President Obama finished withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq in 2011, but had to send the U.S. military back a few years later with the rise of ISIS.

Biden also said it is “long overdue” to withdraw U.S. combat troops from Afghanistan and that he would make sure the 2001 war authorization that’s still in use “is only used for what its intent was, and that is to go after terrorists.”

Sanders stepped in to tout his own record, retorting that he “helped lead the opposition” to the Iraq War and highlighted his recent efforts to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition operating in Yemen’s civil war.

“I will do everything I can to prevent a war with Iran, which would be far worse than disastrous war with Iraq,” Sanders added.