Buttigieg: We don't know what allies Trump 'will have pissed off worst'

Buttigieg: We don't know what allies Trump 'will have pissed off worst'
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South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete ButtigiegPeter (Pete) Paul ButtigiegButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Overnight Health Care: Cigarette smoking rates at new low | Spread of vaping illness slowing | Dems in Congress push to block Trump abortion rule Ocasio-Cortez jabs 'plutocratic' late entrants to 2020 field MORE said the U.S. relationship with “the entire world” will need to change following President TrumpDonald John TrumpButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California Kavanaugh hailed by conservative gathering in first public speech since confirmation MORE’s tenure.

“We have no idea which of our most important allies he will have pissed off worst between now and then,” Buttigieg quipped Thursday during the Democratic presidential primary debate. “What we know is that our relationship with the entire world needs to change. It starts by modeling American values at home.”

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Buttigieg was responding to a question posed to all 10 candidates on stage about which U.S. relationship they would repair first if elected, one of the few foreign policy questions in the two-hour debate.

Trump has disparaged U.S. allies throughout his tenure, such as demanding NATO members pay more for the price of their own defense.

Several candidates on Thursday cited NATO as the issue they would focus on first, including former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses GOP eager for report on alleged FBI surveillance abuse Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California MORE, Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisBiden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California Overnight Health Care: Cigarette smoking rates at new low | Spread of vaping illness slowing | Dems in Congress push to block Trump abortion rule Democratic senators introduce bill to push ICE to stop 'overuse' of solitary confinement MORE (D-Calif.) and Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael SwalwellKey takeaways from first public impeachment hearing Kent, Taylor say they're not 'Never Trumpers' after Trump Twitter offensive Live coverage: House holds first public impeachment hearing MORE (D-Calif.).

“We know NATO will fall apart if [Trump is] elected four more years,” Biden said. 

Author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting Williamson announces poverty plan with support for universal basic income, minimum wage Yang seeks donations for 2020 rival Marianne Williamson: 'She has much more to say' MORE said she would call up European leaders and tell them, “We’re back.”

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand Bennet 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting Biden, Buttigieg condemn rocket attacks on Israel Press: Another billionaire need not apply MORE (D-Colo.) also said he would repair relationships with European allies, as well as Latin American countries “willing to have a conversation about how to deal with the refugee crisis.”

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandMaloney primary challenger calls on her to return, donate previous campaign donations from Trump Senate confirms controversial circuit court nominee She Should Run launches initiative to expand number of women in political process MORE (D-N.Y.) highlighted Iran, saying Trump is “hell-bent” on starting a war there and that she would make sure “we do not start an unwanted, never-ending war.”

Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersButtigieg surges ahead of Iowa caucuses Biden leads among Latino Democrats in Texas, California On The Money: Trump appeals to Supreme Court to keep tax returns from NY prosecutors | Pelosi says deal on new NAFTA 'imminent' | Mnuchin downplays shutdown threat | Trump hits Fed after Walmart boasts strong earnings MORE (I-Vt.) said he would “rebuild trust in the entire United Nations.”

Former Colorado Gov. John HickenlooperJohn HickenlooperKrystal Ball dismisses Rahm Emanuel's 'Medicare for All' criticism as a 'corporatist mantra' Trump says remark about Colorado border wall was made 'kiddingly' Colorado governor mocks Trump for saying he's building wall there MORE and tech entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew Yang 2020 Democrats demand action on guns after Santa Clarita shooting Panel devolves over new Russian accusation about Tulsi Yang unveils '21st century approach' to regulating tech MORE both said China, with Yang adding Beijing will be important to work with on climate change, artificial intelligence and North Korea.

In one of the other few foreign policy questions, Biden also defended his record of voting for the Iraq War, highlighting that the Obama administration withdrew troops from Iraq.

President Obama finished withdrawing U.S. troops from Iraq in 2011, but had to send the U.S. military back a few years later with the rise of ISIS.

Biden also said it is “long overdue” to withdraw U.S. combat troops from Afghanistan and that he would make sure the 2001 war authorization that’s still in use “is only used for what its intent was, and that is to go after terrorists.”

Sanders stepped in to tout his own record, retorting that he “helped lead the opposition” to the Iraq War and highlighted his recent efforts to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition operating in Yemen’s civil war.

“I will do everything I can to prevent a war with Iran, which would be far worse than disastrous war with Iraq,” Sanders added.