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House votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale

Congress and President TrumpDonald John TrumpFox News president, top anchors advised to quarantine after coronavirus exposure: report Six notable moments from Trump and Biden's '60 Minutes' interviews Biden on attacks on mental fitness: Trump thought '9/11 attack was 7/11 attack' MORE are headed for a second veto showdown over Saudi Arabia after the House approved three resolutions Wednesday to block emergency arms sales to the kingdom.

Wednesday’s votes on the Senate-passed measures send them to Trump’s desk, where he is expected to use his veto pen for a third time.

The House approved two of the resolutions 238-190 and the third resolution 237-190. For all three resolutions, four Republicans voted yes: Reps. Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John GallagherFederal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats Government watchdog recommends creation of White House cyber director position Hillicon Valley: 'Fortnite' owner sues Apple after game is removed from App Store | Federal agencies seize, dismantle cryptocurrency campaigns of major terrorist organizations MORE (Wis.), Trey HollingsworthJoseph (Trey) Albert HollingsworthHillicon Valley: Twitter flags Trump campaign tweet of Biden clip as manipulated media | Democrats demand in-person election security briefings resume | Proposed rules to protect power grid raise concerns Lawmakers call for bipartisan push to support scientific research The Hill's 12:30 Report: Presidential race tightens in key states MORE (Ind.), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieHouse in near-unanimous vote affirms peaceful transfer of power Ron Paul hospitalized in Texas GOP lawmaker praises Kyle Rittenhouse's 'restraint' for not emptying magazine during shooting MORE (Ky.) and Alex MooneyAlexander (Alex) Xavier MooneyHouse GOP lawmakers urge Senate to confirm Vought Overnight Defense: House passes bills to rein in Trump on Iran | Pentagon seeks Iraq's permission to deploy missile defenses | Roberts refuses to read Paul question on whistleblower during impeachment trial Here are the lawmakers who defected on Iran legislation MORE (W.V.). Newly independent Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashEnergized by polls, House Democrats push deeper into GOP territory Ocasio-Cortez draws hundreds of thousands of viewers on Twitch livestream Hillicon Valley: House votes to condemn QAnon | Americans worried about foreign election interference | DHS confirms request to tap protester phones MORE (Mich.) also supported the resolutions.

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Congress is not expected to have the votes to override Trump’s veto. But the faceoff shows how far apart Congress and the White House have drifted on Saudi Arabia, and lawmakers are vowing not to let up on holding Riyadh accountable.

“I’ve supported our partners and our partnerships in the Gulf region. I think they’re an important counterbalance to the threat Iran poses. And I recognize that our partners face real threats from Iranian-backed Houthis, who are themselves guilty of serious human rights abuses,” House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelOvernight Defense: Trump, Biden set to meet in final debate | Explicit Fort Bragg tweets were sent by account administrator | China threatens retaliation over Taiwan arms sale Is Trump a better choice for Jewish voters than Biden? Overnight Defense: Trump says he's leaving Walter Reed, 'feeling really good' after COVID-19 treatment | White House coronavirus outbreak grows | Dems expand probe into Pompeo speeches MORE (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday.

“But that doesn’t mean we should just look the other way in the face of violence and slaughter of civilians perpetrated by our partners. It doesn’t mean we look the other way and let the president ride roughshod over Congress,” he continued. “So even if this administration will not stand up for the values, the Congress should. And the Congress will.”

Earlier this year, Congress approved a resolution to end U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition fighting Iran-backed Houthi rebels in Yemen’s civil war.

Trump used the second veto of his presidency to quash the Yemen resolution. The Senate, where the resolution originated, did not muster the 67 votes needed to override the veto.

Congress has been furious at Saudi Arabia over its killing of U.S.-based journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul last year.

Khashoggi’s death compounded existing anger at Saudi Arabia over the Yemen civil war’s civilian deaths, the majority of which have been blamed on Saudi-led coalition airstrikes.

Despite Congress already having registered its displeasure with the Yemen war powers vote, in May, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoArmenia and Azerbaijan say they will implement ceasefire agreement Monday Entire Nigerian police force mobilized after days of violent protests that have killed at least 69 Hillicon Valley: Treasury sanctions Russian group accused of targeting critical facilities | Appeals court rules Uber, Lyft must comply with labor laws | Biden: Countries that target US elections will 'pay a price' MORE invoked an emergency provision of the law governing arms sales to approve 22 deals with Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Jordan without the typical 30-day congressional review period.

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The move infuriated lawmakers, who accused the Trump administration of attempting to bypass Congress. Lawmakers had been blocking the sales from moving forward because of concerns about the civilian casualties in Yemen.

The administration and its allies have argued the arms sales are necessary because of what they described as heightened threats from Iran.

“Right now, as I speak, Iran is stretching its tentacles of terror across the Middle East,” Foreign Affairs ranking member Rep. Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulBiden endorses Texas Democratic House candidate Julie Oliver Warren, Porter to headline progressive fundraiser supporting seven swing state candidates Bipartisan action needed to counter Chinese influence MORE (R-Texas) said. “One of the ways we can push back against Iran’s murderous aggression is by empowering our partners in the region.”

In June, the Senate voted 53-45 to block two of the emergency arms sales, and 51-45 to block the other 20.

The House only voted on three of the arms sales in the interest of time since Trump is assured to veto them, Democratic leadership has said.

The three sales the lower chamber chose to vote on are the ones most relevant to the Yemen civil war, House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerTop Democrats introduce resolution calling for mask mandate, testing program in Senate Trump orders aides to halt talks on COVID-19 relief This week: Coronavirus complicates Senate's Supreme Court fight MORE (D-Md.) told reporters Tuesday.

Engel also said Wednesday that the three sales are the first of the 22 slated to be shipped out in the next two months.

The resolutions voted on Wednesday cover Paveway precision-guided munitions for the Saudis and Emirates, as well as fuzing systems to detonate the bombs.

The Paveway deal with the Saudis also includes the co-production of the so-called smart bombs, an aspect that has raised concerns among lawmakers who say it runs the risk of giving the Saudis access to sensitive technology to produce their own version of the bomb.

“The evidence is clear: the Saudi government continues to disregard the vital distinction between combatants and innocent civilians in Yemen,” Rep. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerDuring pandemic, 'telehealth' emerging as important lifeline to connect patients with caregivers Chamber-backed Democrats embrace endorsements in final stretch Spanberger's GOP challenger raises over .8 million in third quarter MORE (D-Va.) said. “Not only is the administration trying to the Saudis more powerful weapons, but we are giving them the opportunity to build their own.”

The White House issued a veto threat ahead of the Senate’s vote on the resolutions, arguing that they would hinder “our partner’s ability to deter and defend against Iranian military aggression” and would “send a message that the United States is abandoning its partners and allies at the very moment when threats to them are increasing.”

With the veto unlikely to be overridden, lawmakers are already plotting next steps on Saudi Arabia.

The House earlier this week overwhelmingly approved a bill that would require the director of national intelligence to determine who is responsible for Khashoggi’s death and impose visa restrictions on those people.

On the other side of the Capitol, Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischWhy the US should rely more on strategy, not sanctions Davis: The Hall of Shame for GOP senators who remain silent on Donald Trump Senators blast Turkey's move to convert Hagia Sophia back into a mosque MORE (R-Okla.) has introduced a bill he hopes can both satisfy lawmakers’ concerns and win Trump’s signature.

Risch’s bill, which has bipartisan co-sponsors, would force the Trump administration to undergo a "comprehensive review" of the U.S.-Saudi relationship.

But Risch’s bill could be amended with a competing bill from Sens. Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezSenate Democrats hold talkathon to protest Barrett's Supreme Court nomination Watchdog confirms State Dept. canceled award for journalist who criticized Trump Kasie Hunt to host lead-in show for MSNBC's 'Morning Joe' MORE (D-N.J.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungRepublicans: Supreme Court won't toss ObamaCare Vulnerable Republicans break with Trump on ObamaCare lawsuit Senate GOP eyes early exit MORE (R-Ind.) that is backed by a majority of the committee, raising questions about the viability of getting something signed into law. The competing bill includes automatic sanctions and a temporary suspension of arms sales to Saudi Arabia.

The committee is scheduled to consider Risch’s bill Tuesday morning, Risch said Wednesday.

Updated 7:23 p.m.