Hurricane-hit bases among those losing funds to Trump wall

Hurricane-ravaged bases in Florida, North Carolina and Puerto Rico are among the military sites that will lose funds because of the Trump administration’s decision to redirect $3.6 billion from military construction projects to a wall on the Mexican border.

The Pentagon on Wednesday announced the specific cuts that will take place because of the redirection of funds, though it cast the changes as delaying projects, not ending them.

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“We’ve got an emergency on the southwest border that we need to address. All of these projects are important,” a senior defense official told reporters at the Pentagon.

They added that the Defense Department will work with Congress to replenish or “backfill” funding to finish the projects but admitted that such a move wasn’t guaranteed.

"We’re very focused right now on working with Congress to get the backfill that we need," they said. "If there’s things that progress that don’t work out, we’ll adjust and we’ll plan as we need to."

The GOP-controlled Senate has already agreed to fund the deferred projects in its annual National Defense Authorization Act, but the Democratic-led House said it will not do the same in its version of the bill.

The official acknowledged that, with this divide, the department has “a lot of work ahead of us.” 

A total of 127 military construction projects are being put on hold due to the administration’s decision, half of which are overseas and half of which are planned U.S. projects. 

The list, released a day after Defense Secretary Mark EsperMark EsperOvernight Defense: Stopgap spending measure awaits Senate vote | Trump nominates former Nunes aide for intelligence community watchdog | Trump extends ban on racial discrimination training to contractors, military Overnight Defense: Pentagon redirects pandemic funding to defense contractors | US planning for full Afghanistan withdrawal by May | Anti-Trump GOP group puts ads in military papers Official: Pentagon has started 'prudent planning' for full Afghanistan withdrawal by May MORE formally approved the decision to divert billions away from the construction plans to pay for 175 miles of barrier on the U.S.-Mexico border, includes projects across 23 states, 19 countries and three territories.

About $1.1 billion would be cut from projects in the continental United States, while $700 million would come from efforts in U.S. territories and $1.8 billion from bases overseas.

Most targeted are those that would tackle less pressing needs, including parking areas, roads and a dining facility, but the list also includes planned schools, target ranges, a missile field expansion, maintenance facilities, a crash rescue station and a cyber operations facility.

Impacted at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida is a $17 million crash rescue station project.

Two projects worth a combined $41 million at Camp Lejeune, N.C., will also be deferred, as will 10 projects worth more than $402.5 million across five Puerto Rico bases.

Tyndall, Camp Lejeune and the Puerto Rico bases were all devastated in hurricanes in the past two years and are still rebuilding billions of dollars' worth of damage.

The senior defense official stressed that the projects on the list for the three locations “are not going to be delayed because of how far out into the future they are” and that cleanup efforts at the bases are still funded and ongoing.  

The official said that earlier in the day, the Pentagon finished notifying lawmakers of the specific projects in their districts that will be ransacked to free up the billions of dollars as well as the governments of countries that house U.S. bases abroad.

The list includes projects in states represented by Republican senators who voted in support of Trump’s emergency declaration.

Those include Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland TillisTillis appears to reinforce question about COVID-19 death toll Billionaire who donated to Trump in 2016 donates to Biden Collins: Winner of presidential election will be sworn in next year MORE (N.C.), whose state has three projects on the list worth a combined $80 million; Sen. Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyThe Hill's Campaign Report: Presidential polls tighten weeks out from Election Day Mark Kelly: Arizona Senate race winner should be sworn in 'promptly' New ABC/WaPost poll finds Trump edging Biden in Arizona, Florida MORE (Ariz.), with one $30 million project at Fort Huachuca; Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump 'no longer angry' at Romney because of Supreme Court stance On The Money: Anxious Democrats push for vote on COVID-19 aid | Pelosi, Mnuchin ready to restart talks | Weekly jobless claims increase | Senate treads close to shutdown deadline The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump faces backlash after not committing to peaceful transition of power MORE (Ky.), whose state had a planned nearly $63 million middle school at Fort Campbell; Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerBillionaire who donated to Trump in 2016 donates to Biden The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by Facebook - Trump previews SCOTUS nominee as 'totally brilliant' Cook Political Report shifts Colorado Senate race toward Democrat MORE (Co.), with an $8 million project at Peterson Air Force Base; Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamSteele Dossier sub-source was subject of FBI counterintelligence probe Hillicon Valley: Subpoenas for Facebook, Google and Twitter on the cards | Wray rebuffs mail-in voting conspiracies | Reps. raise mass surveillance concerns Key Democrat opposes GOP Section 230 subpoena for Facebook, Twitter, Google MORE (S.C.), whose state had a planned fire station replacement for $11 million; and John CornynJohn CornynQuinnipiac polls show Trump leading Biden in Texas, deadlocked race in Ohio The Hill's Campaign Report: GOP set to ask SCOTUS to limit mail-in voting Liberal super PAC launches ads targeting vulnerable GOP senators over SCOTUS fight MORE (Texas), whose state had two projects worth $48 million that will now be deferred.

All six lawmakers are up for reelection in 2020.

Lawmakers on Wednesday voiced their displeasure with the administration’s decision, though the GOP was hesitant to call on Trump to find alternative means to pay for his promised wall.

“We continue to face a very real crisis at the southern border. I regret that the president has been forced to divert funding for our troops to address the crisis,” House Armed Services Committee ranking member Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryTrump payroll-tax deferral for federal workers sparks backlash Overnight Defense: Woodward book causes new firestorm | Book says Trump lashed out at generals, told Woodward about secret weapons system | US withdrawing thousands of troops from Iraq Top Armed Services Republican 'dismayed' at Trump comments on military leaders MORE (R-Texas) said in a statement.

Esper, who is traveling to Stuttgart, Germany; London; and Paris this week, sidestepped questions on the topic when asked by reporters traveling with him.

He declined to comment on concerns from lawmakers on construction projects in their states being sidelined, citing ongoing talks with lawmakers.