State Department's top arms control official leaving

State Department's top arms control official leaving
© Getty

The State Department’s top official for arms control is leaving, Secretary of State Mike PompeoMichael (Mike) Richard PompeoUS, Sudan to exchange ambassadors for first time in decades Iran expert: Trump's foreign policy approach aimed at instigating 'unrest' Fox's Napolitano says obstruction 'easiest' impeachment offense for Democrats MORE announced Friday.

“Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security Andrea Thompson is a dedicated public servant who brought over 25 years of military experience to her role at the State Department,” Pompeo said in a statement.

“Her wealth of knowledge, experience, and leadership skills will be missed,” he added. “I thank her for her commitment to the State Department’s mission and for her decades of service to the United States of America. I wish her all the best in her future endeavors.”

ADVERTISEMENT

The statement provided no reason for Thompson's departure.

She was sworn in as under secretary of State in June 2018. Prior to that, she served as Vice President Pence’s national security adviser.

Over the summer, Thompson came under scrutiny after The Washington Post reported that she failed to disclose during her confirmation process personal and financial ties with a GOP operative who dated convicted Russian agent Maria ButinaMaria ButinaRussia offers Maria Butina a job at human rights commission Butina deported to Russia after release from prison GOP lawmaker says newly-released Butina was jailed due to 'Russophobia' MORE.

As the department’s top arms control official, Thompson had a lead role as the Trump administration withdrew from the 1987 Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces Treaty with Russia.

The treaty, which the United States withdrew from in August over alleged Russian violations, banned both countries from having nuclear and conventional ground-launched ballistic and cruise missiles with ranges between 500 and 5,500 kilometers.

Thompson also clashed with lawmakers in both parties. During a Senate Foreign Relations Committee hearing on arms control in May, ranking member Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezThe job no GOP senator wants: 'I'd rather have a root canal' Senate passes legislation supporting Hong Kong protesters Graham blocks resolution recognizing Armenian genocide after Erdoğan meeting MORE (D-N.J.) blasted her for dodging questions, saying it showed “disdain” for Congress. 

At the same hearing, she clashed with Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzSanders meets with MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred Cruz knocks Chick-fil-A over past donation: It has 'lost its way' Overnight Energy: Relocated BLM staff face salary cuts | UN report calls for drastic action on climate change | California asks EPA to reconsider emissions rule MORE (R-Texas) as he grilled her on the administration’s decision to extend some nuclear waivers for Iran.