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Trump says he's mobilizing military to distribute potential coronavirus vaccine

President TrumpDonald John TrumpNearly 300 former national security officials sign Biden endorsement letter DC correspondent on the death of Michael Reinoehl: 'The folks I know in law enforcement are extremely angry about it' Late night hosts targeted Trump over Biden 97 percent of the time in September: study MORE said Thursday he would prepare the U.S. military to disburse COVID-19 vaccines when they are ready.

"We're mobilizing our military and other forces, but we're mobilizing our military on the basis that we do have a vaccine," Trump said in an interview with Fox Business's Maria BartiromoMaria Sara BartiromoHillicon Valley: DOJ accuses Russian hackers of targeting 2018 Olympics, French elections | Federal commission issues recommendations for securing critical tech against Chinese threats | House Democrats slam FCC over 'blatant attempt to help' Trump Ratcliffe, Schiff battle over Biden emails, politicized intelligence Pompeo denies push for Clinton emails violates Hatch Act MORE.

"You know, it's a massive job to give this vaccine. Our military is now being mobilized so at the end of the year we're going to be able to give it to a lot of people very, very rapidly," he added.

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Trump said the mobilization process for distributing a vaccine is "starting now" to get a head start once it is finished, adding, "We will have a tremendous force because assuming we get it, then you have to distribute it."

The president announced Wednesday that he would place Army Gen. Gustave Perna as chief operation officer for Operation Warp Speed, the administration's program targeting a fast development for COVID-19 vaccines.

Trump also said on Thursday that he expects a ready vaccine by the end of 2020. However, projections from the nation's leading infectious disease expert and coronavirus task force member Anthony FauciAnthony FauciFauci quotes 'The Godfather' in response to latest Trump attacks Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Trump's scorched earth style overshadows campaign's message in final weeks MORE cautioned earlier this year that a vaccine could take 12 to 18 months.

According to data from Johns Hopkins University, the U.S. has recorded more than 85,000 deaths from the virus since the outbreak hit the nation.

Trump estimated in the interview that there will be a total of more than 100,000 deaths in the country.