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White House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push

White House open to reforming war powers amid bipartisan push
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The White House on Friday signaled a willingness to work with Congress on developing a narrow framework for the authorizations of use of military force after President BidenJoe BidenBiden administration still seizing land near border despite plans to stop building wall: report Olympics, climate on the agenda for Biden meeting with Japanese PM Boehner on Afghanistan: 'It's time to pull out the troops' MORE's strikes in Syria last week sparked a fresh war powers debate.

Sens. Tim KaineTimothy (Tim) Michael KaineSenators reintroduce bill to block NATO withdrawal Democrats back up Biden bid to return to Iran nuclear deal Overnight Defense: Congress looks to rein in Biden's war powers | Diversity chief at Special Operations Command reassigned during probe into social media posts MORE (D-Va.) and Todd YoungTodd Christopher YoungTo encourage innovation, Congress should pass two bills protecting important R&D tax provision Senate Republicans voice opposition to Biden on Iran Biden infrastructure proposal prioritizes funds for emerging technologies MORE (R-Ind.) introduced a bill in the Senate this week that would repeal two military authorizations, effectively curbing the president's war powers.

White House press secretary Jen PsakiJen PsakiOvernight Defense: Administration says 'low to moderate confidence' Russia behind Afghanistan troop bounties | 'Low to medium risk' of Russia invading Ukraine in next few weeks | Intelligence leaders face sharp questions during House worldwide threats he Overnight Health Care: Johnson & Johnson delay prompts criticism of CDC panel | Pfizer CEO says third dose of COVID-19 vaccine 'likely' needed within one year | CDC finds less than 1 percent of fully vaccinated people got COVID-19 Hillicon Valley: Biden administration sanctions Russia for SolarWinds hack, election interference MORE called Kaine "a leader on questions of war powers throughout his time in the Senate," and indicated the executive branch would be open to changes.

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"We are committed to working with Congress to ensure that the authorizations for the use of military force currently on the books are replaced with a narrow and specific framework that will ensure we can protect Americans from terrorist threats while ending the forever wars," Psaki said in a statement Friday.

The bill from Kaine and Young would repeal the 1991 and 2002 authorizations for the use of military force (AUMFs), which both deal with Iraq. Senators sought to rein in the president's war powers during the Trump administration, but failed to muster enough votes.

Biden's decision to launch airstrikes in Syria last week reignited the debate, with lawmakers in both parties expressing frustration over a lack of consultation with Congress before military action was taken. The administration didn’t cite either the 1991 or 2002 authorization for the military strikes, the first known to be carried out since Biden took office.

In addition to Kaine and Young, Sens. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthLawmakers demand justice for Adam Toledo: 'His hands were up. He was unarmed' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Overnight Defense: Biden officially rolls out Afghanistan withdrawal plan | Probe finds issues with DC Guard helicopter use during June protests MORE (D-Ill.), Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeBiden sparks bipartisan backlash on Afghanistan withdrawal  Hillicon Valley: Biden nominates former NSA deputy director to serve as cyber czar | Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after all | Biden pressed on semiconductor production amid shortage Apple to send witness to Senate hearing after pushback from Klobuchar, Lee MORE (R-Utah), Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsModerates' 0B infrastructure bill is a tough sell with Democrats Schumer lays groundwork for future filibuster reform Pavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate MORE (D-Del.), Chuck GrassleyChuck GrassleyGrassley: Iowa can't afford to be 'babysitting' unaccompanied minors Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle On The Money: Senate confirms Gensler to lead SEC | Senate GOP to face off over earmarks next week | Top Republican on House tax panel to retire MORE (R-Iowa), Dick DurbinDick DurbinLawmakers demand justice for Adam Toledo: 'His hands were up. He was unarmed' Schumer warns Democrats can't let GOP block expansive agenda Holder, Yates lead letter backing Biden pick for Civil Rights Division at DOJ MORE (D-Ill.) and Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Tax March - CDC in limbo on J&J vax verdict; Rep. Brady retiring Anti-Asian hate crimes bill overcomes first Senate hurdle Fauci on Tucker Carlson vaccine comments: 'Typical crazy conspiracy theory' MORE (R-Ky.) are backing the bill.