SPONSORED:

Military may use capital punishment for first time in 55 years

Military may use capital punishment for first time in 55 years
© Getty Images

The U.S. military might execute a prisoner for the first time in more than 55 years, according to a new report.

Former Army soldier Ronald Gray, who was convicted and condemned to death in 1988 for two murders and three rapes in North Carolina, has been denied a stay of execution, CNN said Thursday.

Gray, who served as cook while stationed at Fort Bragg, pleaded guilty to two other murders and five rapes in civilian courts.

ADVERTISEMENT

Judge J. Thomas Marten of the U.S. District Court for the District of Kansas last week denied Gray’s bid for another stay.

Marten ruled that a previously granted stay of execution was “no longer in effect,” raising the possibility that Gray may suffer the first military execution since 1961.

CNN said Gray is one of six former servicemen on the military’s death row at Fort Leavenworth facing the possibility of lethal injection.

Fort Leavenworth most recently added former Army Maj. Nidal Hassan, who was convicted of murdering 13 at Fort Hood near Killeen, Texas.