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Colin Powell on Afghanistan: 'We've done all we can do'

Colin Powell on Afghanistan: 'We've done all we can do'
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Former Secretary of State Colin PowellColin Luther PowellOvernight Defense: Biden makes his Afghanistan decision Colin Powell on Afghanistan: 'We've done all we can do' Is nonpartisan effectiveness still possible? MORE said Tuesday that President BidenJoe BidenBiden says Beau's assessment of first 100 days would be 'Be who you are' Biden: McCarthy's support of Cheney ouster is 'above my pay grade' Conservative group sues over prioritization of women, minorities for restaurant aid MORE’s decision to withdraw all U.S. troops from Afghanistan by September "was overdue," even as Biden faced bipartisan criticism over the announcement.

“I wouldn’t say enough is enough,” Powell told The Washington Post. “I’d say we’ve done all we can do. ... What are those troops being told they’re there for? It’s time to bring it to an end.”

Powell, a retired general who has also served as national security adviser and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was in charge of the Bush administration State Department during the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks and the subsequent beginning of the Afghanistan war.  

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In his interview with the Post, he also mentioned how the Soviet Union withdrew its troops from Afghanistan in 1989, saying they “did it the same way.” 

“They got tired, and they marched out and back home. How long did anybody remember that? he asked. 

Powell was one of the Republicans who backed Biden during his campaign last year against then-President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE, including appearing at the Democratic National Convention.

Biden is expected on Wednesday to announce that he will bring all U.S. troops home from Afghanistan by the 20th anniversary of 9/11 later this year. 

The news sparked pushback from lawmakers in both parties. 

"Precipitously withdrawing U.S. forces from Afghanistan is a grave mistake. It is retreat in the face of an enemy that has not yet been vanquished and abdication of American leadership,” Minority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden says Beau's assessment of first 100 days would be 'Be who you are' McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal McConnell: 'Good chance' of deal with Biden on infrastructure MORE (R-Ky.) said from the Senate floor.