Overnight Defense: House approves $733 billion defense bill | Liberal sweeteners draw progressive votes | Bill includes measure blocking Trump from military action on Iran

Overnight Defense: House approves $733 billion defense bill | Liberal sweeteners draw progressive votes | Bill includes measure blocking Trump from military action on Iran

THE TOPLINE: After a week of questions, House Democrats were able to come together and pass the annual defense policy bill Friday.

In a 220-197 vote, the House approved the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA), avoiding a potential major embarrassment for Democrats as they kept most of the caucus in line to pass the bill without Republican support.

Friday's passage comes after Democratic leaders' ability to hold the line was called into question earlier in the week.

But in the end, just eight Democrats voted against the bill on final passage.

The breakdown: No Republicans voted in support of the bill.

From the Democrats, the votes against came from Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez endorses challenger to Democrat Lipinski in Illinois race The Hill's Morning Report - What is Trump's next move on Iran? The Memo: Times correction gives GOP lifeline in latest Kavanaugh controversy MORE (N.Y.), Earl BlumenauerEarl BlumenauerMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis Overnight Energy: Democrats call for Ross to resign over report he threatened NOAA officials | Commerce denies report | Documents detail plan to decentralize BLM | Lawmakers demand answers on bee-killing pesticide Oregon Democrats push EPA to justify use of pesticide 'highly toxic' to bees MORE (Ore.), Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralHouse Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment Congressional Hispanic Caucus calls for answers on Mississippi ICE raids Congressional Hispanic Caucus members call for diversity within the Fed MORE (N.Y.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis Lawmakers urge DNC to name Asian American debate moderator Overnight Health Care: Planned Parenthood to leave federal family planning program absent court action | Democrats demand Trump withdraw rule on transgender health | Cummings, Sanders investigate three drug companies for 'obstructing' probe MORE (Calif.), Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTrump seeks to expand electoral map with New Mexico rally Omar says she hopes Netanyahu not reelected Sunday shows - Guns dominate after Democratic debate MORE (Minn.), Mark PocanMark William PocanOmar says US should reconsider aid to Israel Trump crosses new line with Omar, Tlaib, Israel move Liberal Democrat eyes aid cuts to Israel after Omar, Tlaib denied entry MORE (Wis.), Ayanna PressleyAyanna PressleyTrump praises Kavanaugh as a 'great, brilliant man,' blasts NYT over 'smear' report at rally Pressley to introduce resolution to open impeachment inquiry against Kavanaugh Ilhan Omar, Ayanna Pressley dance to Lizzo's 'Truth Hurts' in video MORE (Mass.) and Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOmar says she hopes Netanyahu not reelected Bill Maher, Michael Moore spar over Democrats' strategy for 2020 Young insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight MORE (Mich.).

Deciding factors: Despite concerns about the price tag, progressives said they could support the NDAA if their other amendments passed. They were particularly concerned about amendments related to President TrumpDonald John TrumpBusiness, ballots and battling opioids: Why the Universal Postal Union benefits the US Sanders supporters cry foul over Working Families endorsement of Warren California poll: Biden, Sanders lead Democratic field; Harris takes fifth MORE's war powers.

Earlier Friday, the House passed an amendment to prevent President Trump from launching a military strike on Iran without prior congressional approval.

Democrats also approved amendments to block emergency arms sales to Saudi Arabia, end U.S. military support to the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen and repeal the 2002 authorization for the use of military force that authorized the Iraq War, among others.

"I held my nose and voted yes," Progressive Caucus co-chair Rep. Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalPelosi woos progressives on prescription drug pricing plan Democrats ignore Asian American and Pacific Islander voters at their peril Overnight Health Care: Watchdog details severe trauma suffered by separated children | Judge approves B CVS-Aetna merger | House Dem Caucus chair backs 'Medicare for All' MORE (D-Wash.) said after the vote.

House Armed Services Committee Chairman Adam SmithDavid (Adam) Adam SmithIran talks unlikely despite window of opportunity GOP lawmakers call for provisions barring DOD funds for border wall to be dropped Warren's pledge to avoid first nuclear strike sparks intense pushback MORE (D-Wash.) "worked very hard to incorporate some progressive priorities," she added. "And then I'm working with Chairman Smith on establishing different ways that we can actually start to make the case for lowering military defense spending."

On Iran: As noted above, the House approved the amendment intended to block Trump from taking military action against Iran.

The amendment, approved 251-170, would prohibit funding U.S. military action against Iran unless Congress has declared war or enacted another specific statutory authorization.

Twenty-seven Republicans sided with Democrats to support the amendment, while seven Democrats voted against it.

Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Khanna: I 'didn't appreciate' Castro's attack on Biden Overwhelming majority of voters want lawmakers to work with other party MORE (D-Calif.), the amendment's chief sponsor, touted the measure as sending a strong signal to Trump.

"It reminds the president that the American people, both Democrats and Republicans, don't want another war in the Middle East," Khanna told reporters "The president was fully aware of this. This is what he said when he campaigned, and he's probably going to want to say it again when he campaigns again. So I think it's a reminder to him of where public sentiment is and that he shouldn't get too influenced by the Washington establishment."

What's next: The House will now have to reconcile its version of the bill with the Senate's. The Senate passed its version 86-8 last month without any of the progressive amendments that made it into the House version, potentially complicating negotiations on the final bill.

 

SENATORS WANT SANCTIONS AFTER TURKEY TAKES DELIVERY OF RUSSIAN MISSILE SYSTEM: Top senators on Friday called on President Trump to impose sanctions on Turkey after the NATO ally accepted delivery of a Russian air defense missile system, a purchase U.S. officials fear could be used to gather intelligence on the American-made F-35.

President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan "has chosen a perilous partnership with [Russian President Vladimir PutinVladimir Vladimirovich PutinFeehery: Impeachment fever bad for Democratic governing vision Taliban travels to Moscow after Trump declares talks dead Russians tune out Vladimir Putin MORE] at the expense of Turkey's security, economic prosperity and the integrity of the NATO alliance," Sens. James InhofeJames (Jim) Mountain InhofeIs the Senate ready to protect American interests in space? Republicans grumble over Trump shifting military funds to wall Gun debate to shape 2020 races MORE (R-Okla.) and Jack ReedJohn (Jack) Francis ReedIs the Senate ready to protect American interests in space? Trump moving forward to divert .6B from military projects for border wall GOP lawmakers call for provisions barring DOD funds for border wall to be dropped MORE (D-R.I.), the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and Sens. Jim RischJames (Jim) Elroy RischTrump at a pivotal crossroads on Iran Overnight Defense: Trump says he doesn't want war with Iran | Pentagon chief calls attack on Saudi oil facilities 'unprecedented' | Administration weighs response | 17th US service member killed in Afghanistan this year Bolton exit provokes questions about Trump shift on Iran MORE (R-Idaho) and Bob MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezAs NFIP reauthorization deadline looms, Congress must end lethal subsidies Senate Democrats warn Trump: Don't invite Putin to G-7 Pelosi warns Mnuchin to stop 'illegal' .3B cut to foreign aid MORE (D-N.J.), the chairman and ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, said in a statement.

The lawmakers urged Trump to impose congressional sanctions as part of the Countering America's Adversaries Through Sanctions Act, which penalizes U.S. partners that buy Russian military equipment.

"On a strong bipartisan basis, Congress has made it clear that there must be consequences for President Erdogan's misguided S-400 acquisition," they said, referring to the surface-to-air missile defense system from Russia.  

The lawmakers also called on the Defense Department to proceed with the termination of Turkey's participation in the F-35 program.

What happened: Ankara earlier on Friday took delivery of a shipment of the S-400 system.

Acting Defense Secretary Mark Esper told reporters Friday that the Pentagon was aware of the delivery and that he would speak to Turkish Defense Minister Hulusi Akar later in the day.

What the US has threatened: The Pentagon announced in early June that it would pull Turkey from participation in building and maintaining the F-35 Lightning II fighter, moving industrial operations to other countries, unless Ankara gives up its plans to purchase S-400.

Turkey, one of nine partner countries involved in the F-35, has plans to eventually buy at least 100 of the advanced fighter jets and was expected to play a significant role in sustaining the aircraft in later years.

In the past year, however, Ankara has refused to be swayed from its plan to buy the S-400, which is not compatible with NATO systems. U.S. officials fear it will allow Moscow to gather closely guarded information on the Lockheed Martin-made F-35.

The department has already pulled Turkish applicants from a training program that teaches pilots to fly the F-35, and it ordered that all Turkish personnel linked to the F-35 program leave the United States by July 31.

Former acting Defense Secretary Patrick ShanahanPatrick Michael ShanahanDefense chief calls on European allies to be wary of China's investments, blasts Russia Pentagon chief approves 20 more miles of border wall Why Dave Norquist is the perfect choice for DOD's deputy secretary MORE said in a letter to the Turkish defense minister that the penalties would take place by July 31.

The longshot: Administration officials hoped to convince Turkey to abandon the S-400 sale by instead offering Ankara the U.S.-developed Patriot air and missile defense system, made by Raytheon.

Turkey did not take the offer, however, as Washington will not relinquish the system's sensitive missile technology.

What the senators said Friday: "Unfortunately, President Erdogan rejected multiple attempts by the United States to preserve our strategic relationship while enabling Turkey to defend its airspace with F-35 aircraft and the Patriot air defense system," the senators wrote.

"Turkey is an important NATO ally ... But lasting improvement to our cooperation will not be possible as long as President Erdogan remains fixated on deepening ties with Vladimir Putin at the expense of the economic prosperity of Turkey and the security of the NATO alliance," they wrote.

In a separate statement, Sens. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordGOP group's ad calls on Graham to push for election security: 'Are you still trying?' Manufacturing group leads coalition to urge Congress to reauthorize Ex-Im Bank GOP group calls on Republican senators to stand up to McConnell on election security in new ads MORE (R-Okla.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenDemocrats headed for a subpoena showdown with White House Overnight Defense: Dems grill Trump Army, Air Force picks | House chair subpoenas Trump Afghanistan negotiator | Trump officials release military aid to Ukraine Defense spending bill advances over Democratic wall objections MORE (D-N.H.), Thom TillisThomas (Thom) Roland Tillis The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration Tillis places big ad buy as he faces wealthy GOP challenger MORE (R-N.C.) and Chris Van HollenChristopher (Chris) Van HollenProgressive tax-the-rich push gains momentum Senators pressure Trump to help end humanitarian crisis in Kashmir Democratic candidates are building momentum for a National Climate Bank MORE (D-Md.) said the S-400 was "created to target and destroy" the F-35, and that the United States "will not allow sensitive U.S. military technology in the F-35 to be at risk."

"Turkey cannot have both Russian and American defense equipment sitting side by side," the senators wrote. "As long as President Erdogan insists on putting U.S. and NATO assets at risk by acquiring Russian defense technology, the U.S. will withhold our fifth-generation fighter jets and apply our normal restrictions on any government that purchases Russian military equipment."

On the House side: Also delivering a strongly worded statement was Reps. Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelOvernight Defense: Dems grill Trump Army, Air Force picks | House chair subpoenas Trump Afghanistan negotiator | Trump officials release military aid to Ukraine House chairman subpoenas Trump's Afghanistan negotiator Giuliani tears into Democrats after House opens probe into whether he pressured Ukraine to target Biden MORE (D-N.Y.), and Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulTexas Republicans sound alarm about rapidly evolving state Overnight Defense: GOP grumbles after Trump delays military projects for wall | House panel hints at subpoena for Afghanistan envoy | Kabul bombing raises doubts about Taliban talks House panel calls for Afghanistan envoy to testify about deal with Taliban, hints at subpoena MORE (R-Texas), the chairman and ranking member of the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

"We have warned Turkey and President Erdogan time and time again that taking delivery of the Russian S-400 air and missile defense system would have serious consequences for the U.S.-Turkey relationship, including Turkey's participation in the F-35 program," the two wrote. 

"We have warned them that obtaining the S-400 system would trigger sanctions. We have backed the Administration's offer to sell the PATRIOT system to meet Turkey's air and missile defense needs. President Erdogan was given a very clear choice. Unfortunately, he has clearly made the wrong one."

They also called on the Pentagon and State Department to "terminate Turkey's participation in the F-35 program and to sanction Turkish individuals doing business with the Russian defense sector, as required by law."

 

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