Reid draws line against Keystone

Reid draws line against Keystone

Senate Democrats will hold firm and reject House Republican demands to include approval of the Keystone oil pipeline in transportation funding legislation, their leader said Tuesday. 

Senate Majority Leader Harry ReidHarry Mason ReidThe Hill's Morning Report — Pelosi makes it official: Trump will be impeached Doctors are dying by suicide every day and we are not talking about it Impeachment trial throws curveball into 2020 race MORE (D-Nev.) said he would not in any way help Republicans move Keystone approval across the finish line. 

“Personally, I’m not — I’m not one of the conferees — but personally I think Keystone is a program that we’re not going, that I am not going to help in any way I can,” Reid told reporters. “The president feels that way. I do, too.”

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Reid’s position creates more political uncertainty for popular transportation programs and sets Senate Democrats up for a collision with Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock From learning on his feet to policy director MORE (R-Ohio) and other Republicans insisting on the project as a price for a new highway bill.

Reid’s tough line on the Alberta-to-Texas pipeline was also reflected in the lawmakers he chose Tuesday to negotiate with the House. 

Senate leaders picked eight Democrats and six Republicans, and among the Democrats’ selections, only Sen. Max BaucusMax Sieben BaucusBottom line Overnight Defense: McCain honored in Capitol ceremony | Mattis extends border deployment | Trump to embark on four-country trip after midterms Congress gives McCain the highest honor MORE (Mont.) — who isn’t facing reelection until 2014 — has voted for requiring approval of the project to bring oil from Canadian oil sands to Gulf Coast refineries.

 The other seven Democrats include Majority Whip Dick DurbinRichard (Dick) Joseph DurbinSupreme Court poised to hear first major gun case in a decade Protecting the future of student data privacy: The time to act is now Overnight Health Care: Crunch time for Congress on surprise medical bills | CDC confirms 47 vaping-related deaths | Massachusetts passes flavored tobacco, vaping products ban MORE (Ill.) and Sen. Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerOvernight Health Care — Presented by Johnson & Johnson — Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law | Michigan governor seeks to pause Medicaid work requirements | New front in fight over Medicaid block grants House, Senate Democrats call on Supreme Court to block Louisiana abortion law Why a second Trump term and a Democratic Congress could be a nightmare scenario for the GOP MORE (N.Y.), who heads messaging for the caucus, as well as prominent liberal Sens. Barbara BoxerBarbara Levy BoxerHillicon Valley: Ocasio-Cortez clashes with former Dem senator over gig worker bill | Software engineer indicted over Capital One breach | Lawmakers push Amazon to remove unsafe products Ocasio-Cortez blasts former Dem senator for helping Lyft fight gig worker bill Only four Dem senators have endorsed 2020 candidates MORE (Calif.) and Robert MenendezRobert (Bob) MenendezForeign Relations Democrat calls on Iran to release other American prisoners GOP senator blocks Armenian genocide resolution The job no GOP senator wants: 'I'd rather have a root canal' MORE (N.J.). 

Baucus, in a statement through his office, signaled Tuesday that he’s not inclined to insist on approval of the project in the transportation bill talks.

“No one is a bigger supporter of the Keystone pipeline than Sen. Baucus, and he is looking for every opportunity to help move the project forward. But Sen. Baucus will not put more than 1 million American jobs supported by the highway bill in jeopardy unless he’s sure whatever Keystone measure proposed has the legs to pass Congress, be signed into law and stand up to legal scrutiny, so we don’t end up delaying the project even further by getting it tied up in the courts,” his office said in a statement.

The pipeline has become a major issue in the presidential campaign, with presumptive GOP nominee Mitt Romney saying last week, “I will build that pipeline if I have to myself.”

Republicans have sought to use the issue to batter Obama on high gas prices. 

The administration in January rejected a permit for the pipeline. But the White House stressed that its decision was based not on the “merits” but instead because Republicans had demanded an “arbitrary” permit deadline in a late 2011 payroll tax cut bill. The administration has invited developer TransCanada Corp. to reapply for the cross-border permit, which the company intends to do.

It’s possible that Reid’s statement is a negotiating tactic. 

Indeed, some Democrats signaled that there could be room for a compromise that stops well short of GOP demands for almost immediate approval of a cross-border permit for Keystone. 

“It depends on what the Keystone pipeline measure is,” said Sen. Sheldon WhitehouseSheldon WhitehouseOvernight Energy: Pelosi vows bold action to counter 'existential' climate threat | Trump jokes new light bulbs don't make him look as good | 'Forever chemicals' measure pulled from defense bill Pelosi warns of 'existential' climate threat, vows bold action Republicans raise concerns over Trump pardoning service members MORE (D-R.I.). “If it is scheduling and things like that, it is one thing; if it is going to ram it down people’s throats without any review, that’s a different question,” said Whitehouse, who is not on the conference committee. “How it shakes out will be up to the conferees.”

Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryWarren, Buttigieg fight echoes 2004 campaign, serves as warning for 2020 race Krystal Ball: New Biden ad is everything that's wrong with Democrats The Hill's Campaign Report: Democrats worry about diversity on next debate stage MORE (D-Mass.), asked if he was confident that the final transportation bill would be free of Keystone, replied, “It depends what shape it were to be in.

“There may be a lot of people on our side who think [that], properly done, they may find that acceptable — I can’t tell you right now where it is at,” he said.

Kerry and Whitehouse opposed mandatory approval of the pipeline when the Senate voted last month to reject Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenBottom Line The Hill's Morning Report — Schiff: Clear evidence of a quid pro quo Trump steps up GOP charm offensive as impeachment looms MORE’s (R-N.D.) amendment to the highway bill that would have authorized construction. The amendment garnered 56 supporters when 60 were needed for passage.

Lawmakers have until the end of June before existing funding for highway projects expires. The two sides are working to merge the House bill, which is an extension through September that mandates the pipeline, with the Senate’s Keystone-free, two-year highway package.

The House approved its transportation package last week with 69 Democratic votes, a tally that Republicans quickly used to claim momentum for including Keystone in a final package.

The Keystone language, popular among Republicans, is politically helpful for BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFormer Speaker Boehner's official portrait unveiled Key Republicans say Biden can break Washington gridlock From learning on his feet to policy director MORE, who has struggled to corral GOP support for the transportation bill.

Republicans in both chambers see the pipeline as a winning political issue.

They accuse the White House of passing up a chance to improve energy security and create jobs.

Sen. John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneCongress races to beat deadline on shutdown Hillicon Valley: House passes anti-robocall bill | Senators inch forward on privacy legislation | Trump escalates fight over tech tax | Illinois families sue TikTok | Senators get classified briefing on ransomware Senators inch forward on federal privacy bill MORE (R-S.D.) said he’s hopeful the final transportation package will include the pipeline and that Obama will have a “change of heart” about approving the project.

But he also sees an upside to letting it ride.

“From a political standpoint, if they want to fight on this issue all the way into the fall, that is a fight we welcome. This is a no-brainer for the American people; I think we are on the right side of this argument,” he told reporters Tuesday.

Environmentalists bitterly oppose the project due to greenhouse gases from oil sands extraction and use, among other concerns.

Major business groups such as the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and oil companies are pushing for the pipeline.

— Updated at 8:34 p.m.