SPONSORED:

Senate nears 60 on Keystone

645X363 - No Companion - Full Sharing - Additional videos are suggested - Policy/Regulation/Blogs

Supporters of the Keystone XL oil pipeline are nearing 60 votes in the Senate ahead of a vote next week on whether to approve the project.

With passage of a pipeline bill in the House all but assured, Sen. Mary LandrieuMary Loretta LandrieuCassidy wins reelection in Louisiana Bottom line A decade of making a difference: Senate Caucus on Foster Youth MORE (D-La.) says she is “confident” she can rally the 60 votes needed for a filibuster-proof majority in the upper chamber.

"It is ready for a vote and we have the 60 votes to pass it," Landrieu said on Wednesday.

ADVERTISEMENT

The Keystone debate is wrapped up in midterm election politics, with both Landrieu and her opponent in the Louisiana Senate runoff — Rep. Bill Cassidy (R-La.) — taking the lead on legislation. The House is set to vote on Cassidy’s Keystone bill on Friday.

Right now, Keystone supporters have a firm 58 votes in the Senate, 13 of which are from Democrats, after Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Senate confirms Mallory to lead White House environment council | US emissions dropped 1.7 percent in 2019 | Interior further delays Trump rule that would make drillers pay less to feds Key Democrat says traveler fees should fund infrastructure projects Senate confirms Biden's pick to lead White House environmental council MORE (D-Del.) on Thursday said he will vote "yes."

"Enough already, Carper said, when asked Thursday why he is backing the pipeline.

Carper said President Obama should declare victory on the climate deal with China, which he said will have "profound effects" that far outweigh Keystone in the fight on climate change.

"Let's clear the decks" and start talking about other issues, he said.

To reach 60, Landrieu and Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court declines to hear challenge to Obama marine monument designation | Interior reverses course on tribal ownership of portion of Missouri river | White House climate adviser meets with oil and gas companies Senate GOP pushes back on list of participants in oil and gas leasing forum Small cities fret over feds redefining metro areas MORE (R-N.D.), who sponsored the bill, are working overtime to convince on-the-fence Democrats to back the oil sands project.

Hoeven said he is helping Landrieu secure as many votes as possible.

“I thought we would have to wait until the new Congress is seated to have the 60 votes. But if 15 Democrats will join us, we can pass the bill now, and we should,” Hoeven said.

If a Keystone bill passes Congress, it’s unclear whether the president will veto it.

Landrieu said she is confident the bill “could potentially receive the signature of the president of the United States,” but acknowledged she hasn’t received any commitments from the White House.

Press secretary Josh Earnest on Wednesday said the administration’s “dim view of these kinds of proposals has not changed” when asked about the coming Keystone votes in the House and Senate.

Here are the four Democrats that Keystone supporters are most likely to target in the final push for 60 votes:

Sen. Chris CoonsChris Andrew CoonsPavlich: Biden wants 'infrastructure' ­– Republicans should negotiate Schumer warns Democrats can't let GOP block expansive agenda Inflation rears its head amid spending debate MORE (D-Del.)

In May, when Landrieu and Republicans made a push for a Keystone vote, Coons was a no-go. His spokesman, Ian Koski, said earlier this year that Coons “believes the law makes clear that it’s up to the administration.”

Coons’s office on Thursday said the senator is frustrated with the Keystone review but will vote against the authorization bill next week because it isn't Congres's role to issue construction permits.

Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonWhy does Rep. Johnson oppose NASA's commercial human landing system? Trump hands Rubio coveted reelection endorsement in Florida Overnight Defense: Top House Armed Services Republican talks National Guard at Capitol, Afghanistan, more | Pentagon chief visits Afghanistan amid administration's review | Saudis propose Yemen ceasefire MORE (D-Fla.)

Like Coons, Nelson said he would vote "no" earlier this year on a vote, but he is likely one of the Democrats Landrieu will target when whipping votes for the Canada-to-Texas pipeline.

Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetDemocrats get good news from IRS Senators press for answers in Space Command move decision Biden announces first slate of diverse judicial nominees MORE (D-Colo.)

It isn’t clear whether Bennet would join Keystone supporters this time around, but earlier this year told The Wall Street Journal he supports the project.

Bennet’s spokesman has not returned requests for comment.

Sen. Mark UdallMark Emery UdallKennedy apologizes for calling Haaland a 'whack job' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Haaland courts moderates during tense confirmation hearing | GOP's Westerman looks to take on Democrats on climate change | White House urges passage of House public lands package Udalls: Haaland criticism motivated 'by something other than her record' MORE (D-Colo.)

Udall, who lost his reelection bid to Republican Rep. Cory GardnerCory GardnerBiden administration reverses Trump changes it says 'undermined' conservation program Gardner to lead new GOP super PAC ahead of midterms OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court rules against fast-track of Trump EPA's 'secret science' rule | Bureau of Land Management exodus: Agency lost 87 percent of staff in Trump HQ relocation | GM commits to electric light duty fleet by 2035 MORE (Colo.) last week, stands by his position that the process should be able to run its course, his spokesman, Mike Saccone, said Thursday. Udall believes “Congress should not be injecting politics into the pipeline review process.” 

— This story was lsat updated at 2:18 p.m.