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GOP chairman probes Pruitt’s four email addresses

GOP chairman probes Pruitt’s four email addresses
© Greg Nash

The Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) top GOP Senate overseer is looking into the agency’s use of four different email addresses for Administrator Scott PruittEdward (Scott) Scott PruittOvernight Energy: Trump administration doubles down on climate skepticism | Suspended EPA health official hits back | Military bases could host coal, gas exports Suspended EPA health official: Administration’s actions mean ‘kids are disposable’ Overnight Energy: Interior reprimands more than 1,500 for misconduct | EPA removes 22 Superfund sites from list | DOJ nominee on environment nears confirmation MORE.

In a letter sent Friday and obtained by The Hill, Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoWhy grizzly bear hunting season isn’t happening Trump poised to sign bipartisan water infrastructure bill Dems to force health care vote weeks before Nov. midterms MORE (R-Wyo.) asked Pruitt whether the agency has ensured that federal records requests involving him are searching all of his addresses.

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“Can you confirm that the EPA does in fact search all your official email accounts when responding to [Freedom of Information Act] requests?” Barrasso asked Pruitt in the letter. He also asked the EPA head to provide a list of all of the email accounts that Pruitt uses.

Two Democratic senators revealed last week that the EPA has four addresses for Pruitt. The Washington Post reported that the addresses are pruitt.scott@epa.gov, esp7@epa.gov, adm14pruitt@epa.gov and sooners7@epa.gov.

The EPA said at the time that two of them are used by staff for scheduling and correspondence, one is used by Pruitt himself and one hasn’t been used except for three test emails.

Agency heads frequently have email accounts that aren’t revealed to the public, in addition to standard accounts to which anyone could send messages.

An EPA spokesman said the agency “will respond to Chairman Barrasso through the proper channels.”

Barrasso was a leading voice in criticizing then-EPA head Lisa Jackson in 2013, when the agency admitted that she had an email account under the alias “Richard Windsor” that she used extensively for official business.

He and other Republicans accused Jackson of trying to hide her emails from Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, while the EPA at the time said the Richard Windsor account was fully incorporated into FOIA searches.

Barrasso specifically asked Pruitt about the issue during his confirmation hearing in January 2017.

"If confirmed, will you refrain from taking any such action that makes it difficult or impossible for the public to access your official written communications under the Freedom of Information Act," Barrasso asked.

"Yes," he responded.

EPA officials have said Pruitt’s alternative accounts are included in FOIA searches as well, although Barrasso nonetheless asked Pruitt to confirm that in writing.

Sens. Jeff MerkleyJeffrey (Jeff) Alan MerkleyEPA chief calls racist Facebook post he liked ‘absolutely offensive’ Dem senators urge Pompeo to reverse visa policy on diplomats' same-sex partners Overnight Defense — Presented by The Embassy of the United Arab Emirates — Missing journalist strains US-Saudi ties | Senators push Trump to open investigation | Trump speaks with Saudi officials | New questions over support for Saudi coalition in Yemen MORE (D-Ore.) and Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperOvernight Energy: Trump administration doubles down on climate skepticism | Suspended EPA health official hits back | Military bases could host coal, gas exports Trump poised to sign bipartisan water infrastructure bill Overnight Health Care — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Senators face Wednesday vote on Trump health plans rule | Trump officials plan downtime for ObamaCare website | Lawmakers push for action on reducing maternal deaths MORE (D-Del.) are also probing Pruitt’s email accounts. In the letter revealing the additional accounts, they asked the EPA’s Office of Inspector General to launch an investigation.