NASA head: ‘No reason to doubt’ climate change science

NASA head: ‘No reason to doubt’ climate change science

Jim BridenstineJames (Jim) Frederick BridenstineFrom Apollo 11 to Artemis: This time when we go back to the moon, we are going to stay Trump meets with Apollo 11 astronauts to mark moon landing anniversary Trump's NASA administrator talks efforts to return to Moon MORE, the Trump administration’s newly installed NASA head, said on Wednesday that he now believes human activity is the main cause of climate change.

Bridenstine, speaking at a Senate Appropriations Committee subpanel's hearing, said his views on climate change have changed from his previous position that it is unclear how much humans contribute.

“The National Climate Assessment that includes NASA, and it includes the Department of Energy and it includes NOAA, has clearly stated it is extremely likely — is the language they use — that human activity is the dominant cause of global warming,” he said, referring to ongoing government-wide research on climate, which resulted in a major report last year.

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“I have no reason to doubt the science that comes from that.”

Bridenstine was answering a question by Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzDem senator describes 'overcrowded quarters,' 'harsh odor' at border facilities Warren introduces bill targeted at food insecurity on college campuses On The Money: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency | Tech giants on defensive at antitrust hearing | Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses MORE (D-Hawaii), who followed up by asking if the NASA head had undergone an “evolution of your views.”

“Yes,” he responded.

NASA is one of the primary agencies focused on climate change in the federal government. Its satellites and other equipment closely track the temperatures of the Earth’s surface and atmosphere, as well as atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases and other important measures.

Bridenstine’s climate skepticism was one of the chief reasons Democrats opposed his nomination to lead NASA and sought to block his confirmation to the post.

He was nonetheless confirmed by a Senate vote of 50-49 last month, entirely along party lines.