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Japan sees record-breaking temperatures in deadly heat wave

Japan sees record-breaking temperatures in deadly heat wave
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At least 44 people have died in the past few weeks in Japan due to record-breaking temperatures amid a deadly heat wave in the country, CNN reported.

According to Kyodo News, 11 people died on Saturday alone as temperatures in Tokyo rested around 99F on Monday.

The Japan Meteorological Agency reported temperatures to be close to 12 degrees hotter than the country's average as temperatures rose to 105.98F in Kumagaya, which is reportedly Japan’s highest temperature ever on record.

"Potential for heat illness is higher than usual," the agency said in a statement obtained by CNN. The agency also advised residents to "take appropriate measures," including staying hydrated, avoiding direct sunlight and staying in air conditioned settings. 

AccuWeather analyst Joel Myers said in a statement obtained by the publication that the death toll may be "likely already in the hundreds despite the official toll of somewhat more than two dozen," and could rise much higher later.

"The elderly and those with pre-existent conditions, such as asthma and heart failure, are likely to face declining health due to exacerbation of their conditions due to weather," Myers said.

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"Heat exhaustion and stroke, dehydration, migraines, loss of sleep and mood alteration can all occur due to dangerous heat. Historical data shows that more people are likely to be involved in vehicle crashes due to heat-related impacts, such as decreased ability to concentrate, the poor quality of sleep they get and impaired mood,” he continued.

Myers also added that some residents, in parts of the Asian country where high temperatures do not occur as often, don’t have cool locations to go to for relief in the blistering heat as air conditioning is much less prevalent in those regions.

According to the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, last month was the fifth hottest June ever on record. The agency also reported that the hottest ever June on record occurred in 2016 and that all of the 10 warmest Junes have taken place since 2005.