House panel to vote on parks funding bill

House panel to vote on parks funding bill
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A House committee will vote this week on a bipartisan bill that would direct some money from offshore and federal land oil production to improve parks and public land.

The House Natural Resources Committee, chaired by Rep. Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopOvernight Energy: McConnell tees up vote on Green New Deal | Centrist Dems pitch alternative to plan | House Republican likens Green New Deal to genocide | Coca-Cola reveals it uses 3M tons of plastic every year House GOP lawmaker says Green New Deal is like genocide Overnight Energy: Solar installations dropped in 2018 | UN report says rising Arctic temperatures 'locked in' | Fiat Chrysler to recall 850K vehicles MORE (R-Utah), said it will consider the legislation Thursday. Passage would set the bill up for a potential full House vote.

Bishop and ranking member Rep. Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) introduced the bill in July, but the general idea has been pushed by Interior Secretary Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeOvernight Energy: EPA moves to raise ethanol levels in gasoline | Dems look to counter White House climate council | Zinke cleared of allegations tied to special election Zinke cleared of violating federal rules tied to Pennsylvania special election Overnight Energy: Trump unveils 2020 budget | Plan slashes funds for EPA, Interior and Energy | Interior request highlights border security MORE and lawmakers in both parties since at least early 2017.

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Under the Restore Our Parks and Public Lands Act, half of the revenue brought into the federal government from energy production on federal land and offshore, that hasn’t been dedicated to another purpose, would go into an account, with a limit of $1.3 billion per year.

That account would then pay for infrastructure at the National Park Service, the Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau of Land Management and the Bureau of Indian Education.

The bill is meant, in part, to address the NPS maintenance backlog, which now exceeds $11 billion.

The Trump administration is supportive of the idea of using energy revenue for park infrastructure, though Zinke has stopped short of fully endorsing the bill at issue.