Senate panel moves to renew expired park conservation fund

Senate panel moves to renew expired park conservation fund
© Greg Nash

A Senate committee voted Tuesday to revive a popular funding mechanism for parks and conservation, days after its legal authority expired.

The Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee in a 16-7 vote approved a bill to indefinitely renew the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), setting the legislation up for a potential vote in the full Senate.

The fund has strong bipartisan support and has put billions of dollars into federal, state, local and even private parks and other places over the last 53 years.

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Under the bill sponsored by Sen. Maria CantwellMaria Elaine CantwellFAA nominee advances to full Senate vote Women lawmakers to play in Congressional Baseball Game following Title IX anniversary Hillicon Valley: Democratic state AGs sue to block T-Mobile-Sprint merger | House kicks off tech antitrust probe | Maine law shakes up privacy debate | Senators ask McConnell to bring net neutrality to a vote MORE (Wash.), the committee’s top Democrat, 1.5 percent of the fund's payouts must help improve access to lands for recreation.

Cantwell said the LWCF “has pumped billions of dollars into the outdoor economy and has provided for millions of good jobs."

“Protecting our public lands is good for the environment, it’s good for the economy and it’s good for the health and welfare of our people,” she said.

“The Land and Water Conservation Fund is one of the most important programs we have. I believe it is the crown jewel of our conservation programs,” said Sen. Cory GardnerCory Scott GardnerTrump angry more Republicans haven't defended his tweets: report The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Republicans scramble to contain Trump fallout MORE (R-Colo.).

The panel rejected a series of amendments from Sen. Mike LeeMichael (Mike) Shumway LeeOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — Health care moves to center stage of Democratic primary fight | Sanders, Biden trade sharps jabs on Medicare for All | Senate to vote on 9/11 bill next week | Buttigieg pushes for cheaper insulin Senate to vote on 9/11 victims bill on Tuesday Meghan McCain slams Rand Paul over blocking 9/11 compensation funding: 'This is a disgrace' MORE (R-Utah) to put restrictions on the program, like renewing it for only 10 years and requiring that it spend more money on public lands maintenance than on the government buying new land.

The House will have to take action before any legislation can be sent to the White House, and there are important differences between the bill moving through the Senate and legislation in the House.

The House Natural Resources Committee passed a bipartisan bill last month to indefinitely renew the LWCF, the result of a rare deal between Chairman Rob BishopRobert (Rob) William BishopSenators introduce legislation to boost cyber defense training in high school Bureau of Land Management to move headquarters from DC to Colorado Overnight Energy: Democrats to vote on 2020 climate debate | Green groups sue to stop Keystone XL construction | States sue EPA for tougher rules on asbestos MORE (R-Utah) and ranking member Raúl Grijalva (D-Ariz.).

That bill would require at least 40 percent of the funds to go to states and 40 percent to the federal government.

Another key difference is that the Senate bill would turn the LWCF into a mandatory program, making its revenue — up to $900 million a year — exempt from the annual appropriations process.

Bishop has vehemently fought efforts to make it mandatory, as have numerous other Republicans in both chambers. That factor caused Sen. Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiPoll: McConnell is most unpopular senator Overnight Defense: Highlights from Defense pick's confirmation hearing | Esper spars with Warren over ethics | Sidesteps questions on Mattis vs. Trump | Trump says he won't sell F-35s to Turkey Epstein charges show Congress must act to protect children from abuse MORE (R-Alaska), the chairwoman of the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, to oppose the legislation, even though she supports permanently authorizing the LWCF.

Because Congress has not renewed the LWCF, it can no longer collect revenue from offshore oil and natural gas drilling. That money goes into the general federal treasury instead.

The LWCF still has billions of dollars in its coffers, which it can use to fund parks and conservation.

The Senate committee also passed Tuesday, by a vote of 19 to 4, a bill to create a new fund that could pump billions of dollars into the National Park Service.

The Restore Our Parks Act would take half of the money the federal government gets from energy production offshore and on federal land and that hasn’t been dedicated to another purposes and put it toward the Park Service’s nearly $12 billion maintenance backlog.

The idea has the backing of Interior Secretary Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkePuerto Rican police fire tear gas at crowds protesting governor Overnight Energy: Trump officials gut DC staff for public lands agency to move West | Democrats slam EPA over scientific boards | Deepwater Horizon most litigated environmental issue of decade Trump officials gut DC staff as public lands agency preps to move out West MORE.

“To me, it’s about good stewardship,” said Sen. Rob PortmanRobert (Rob) Jones PortmanFighting the opioid epidemic: Congress can't just pass laws, but must also push to enforce them The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by JUUL Labs - House to vote to condemn Trump tweet Rising number of GOP lawmakers criticize Trump remarks about minority Dems MORE (R-Ohio), who introduced the bill with Sen. Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerTop Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Senate passes bill making hacking voting systems a federal crime Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency at hearing MORE (D-Va.).

“And it’s about saving federal tax dollars over the long term, with predictable funding for capital expenditures.”

The House Natural Resources Committee passed its version of the legislation last month. That bill is similar, but it would let the money go to maintenance at the Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Bureau of Indian Education.

Updated at 12:21 p.m.