FEATURED:

GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael

GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael
© Greg Nash

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenFlorida politics play into disaster relief debate On The Money: Stocks slide for second day as Trump blames 'loco' Fed | Mulvaney calls for unity at consumer bureau | Pelosi says Dems will go after Trump tax returns GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael MORE (R-N.J.) says Congress does not need to pass a disaster relief package for victims of Hurricane Michael immediately because the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has sufficient funding.

Frelinghuysen’s statement reflects the views of other GOP lawmakers who say a disaster relief package won’t pass before the election and may even wait until next year.

ADVERTISEMENT

“The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) currently has sufficient funds for immediate disaster response thanks to prior action from Congress,” Frelinghuysen said in a statement.

He said the Appropriations Committee continuously monitors funding levels and disaster response requirements and vowed Congress would pass additional funding if necessary.

“Should the need arise, my committee is prepared to act quickly,” he said. “Our thoughts are with those affected by this and other hurricanes, and we urge all in the storm’s continued path to stay safe.”

A GOP aide said FEMA currently has $25 billion available in its accounts.

A spokesperson for Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonElection Countdown: Dems outraise GOP in final stretch | 2018 midterms already most expensive in history | What to watch in second Cruz-O'Rourke debate | Trump raises 0M for reelection | Why Dems fear Avenatti's approach Midterms in 2018 become most expensive in history The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by the Coalition for Affordable Prescription Drugs — Pollsters: White college-educated women to decide if Dems capture House MORE (D-Fla.), who has been in Florida this week surveying the damage, did not respond to a request for comment.

GOP leaders said it will take a while to determine what if any additional assistance is needed from Congress.

The damage from the storm is projected to cost $30 billion or more.

“I think they need to do an assessment first and we’ll assess that as soon as they’re ready,” said Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynFive takeaways from Cruz, O'Rourke's debate showdown Live coverage: Cruz faces O'Rourke in Texas debate showdown Trump, Feinstein feud intensifies over appeals court nominees MORE (Texas).

“It’s all going to be determined what the needs are and the states are probably going to give us some direction on that,” said Senate Republican Conference Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneThrough a national commitment to youth sports, we can break the obesity cycle Florida politics play into disaster relief debate GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael MORE (R-S.D.).