GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael

GOP chairman: FEMA has enough money for Hurricane Michael
© Greg Nash

House Appropriations Committee Chairman Rodney FrelinghuysenRodney Procter FrelinghuysenFeehery: How Republicans can counter the possible impeachment push Hispanic Caucus sets red lines on DHS spending bill Overnight Energy: Trump to nominate Wheeler as EPA chief | House votes to remove protections for gray wolves | Lawmakers aim to pass disaster funds for California fires MORE (R-N.J.) says Congress does not need to pass a disaster relief package for victims of Hurricane Michael immediately because the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) has sufficient funding.

Frelinghuysen’s statement reflects the views of other GOP lawmakers who say a disaster relief package won’t pass before the election and may even wait until next year.

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“The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) currently has sufficient funds for immediate disaster response thanks to prior action from Congress,” Frelinghuysen said in a statement.

He said the Appropriations Committee continuously monitors funding levels and disaster response requirements and vowed Congress would pass additional funding if necessary.

“Should the need arise, my committee is prepared to act quickly,” he said. “Our thoughts are with those affected by this and other hurricanes, and we urge all in the storm’s continued path to stay safe.”

A GOP aide said FEMA currently has $25 billion available in its accounts.

A spokesperson for Sen. Bill NelsonClarence (Bill) William NelsonMcCaskill: 'Too many embarrassing uncles' in the Senate Bill Nelson uses farewell address to remind colleagues ‘no one person is above the law’ Coal supporter Manchin named top Dem on Senate Energy Committee MORE (D-Fla.), who has been in Florida this week surveying the damage, did not respond to a request for comment.

GOP leaders said it will take a while to determine what if any additional assistance is needed from Congress.

The damage from the storm is projected to cost $30 billion or more.

“I think they need to do an assessment first and we’ll assess that as soon as they’re ready,” said Senate Republican Whip John CornynJohn CornynKevin McLaughlin tapped to serve as NRSC executive director for 2020 On The Money: Trump leaves GOP in turmoil with shutdown looming | Trump names Mulvaney acting chief of staff | China agrees to 3-month freeze of auto tariffs | Dem to seek Deutsche Bank records of Trump's personal finances The Hill's Morning Report — Trump maintains his innocence amid mounting controversies MORE (Texas).

“It’s all going to be determined what the needs are and the states are probably going to give us some direction on that,” said Senate Republican Conference Chairman John ThuneJohn Randolph ThuneHillicon Valley — Presented by AT&T — New momentum for privacy legislation | YouTube purges spam videos | Apple plans B Austin campus | Iranian hackers targeted Treasury officials | FEC to let lawmakers use campaign funds for cyber The Year Ahead: Push for privacy bill gains new momentum On The Money: Trump, Dems battle over border wall before cameras | Clash ups odds of shutdown | Senators stunned by Trump's shutdown threat | Pelosi calls wall 'a manhood thing' for Trump MORE (R-S.D.).