Dems: Congress rejected part of Trump’s car emissions rollback

Dems: Congress rejected part of Trump’s car emissions rollback
© Greg Nash

A trio of Senate Democrats says Congress has specifically rejected the Trump administration’s argument that California doesn’t have the authority to set its own greenhouse gas emissions for cars.

Sens. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperFighting the opioid epidemic: Congress can't just pass laws, but must also push to enforce them Overnight Energy: Scientists flee USDA as research agencies move to Kansas City area | Watchdog finds EPA skirted rules to put industry reps on boards | New rule to limit ability to appeal pollution permits Watchdog finds EPA skirted rules when appointing industry leaders to science boards MORE (D-Del.), Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyHillicon Valley: Trump seeks review of Pentagon cloud-computing contract | FTC weighs updating kids' internet privacy rules | Schumer calls for FaceApp probe | Report says states need more money to secure elections Poll: McConnell is most unpopular senator FTC looks to update children's internet privacy rules MORE (D-Mass.) and Dianne FeinsteinDianne Emiel FeinsteinTop Democrats demand security assessment of Trump properties Democrats warm to idea of studying reparations Hillicon Valley: Senators unload on Facebook cryptocurrency plan | Trump vows to 'take a look' at Google's ties to China | Google denies working with China's military | Tech execs on defensive at antitrust hearing | Bill would bar business with Huawei MORE (D-Calif.) wrote to Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) acting head Andrew Wheeler and Transportation Secretary Elaine ChaoElaine Lan ChaoMcConnell says he's glad his immigrant wife 'not willing to go back home' The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dem leaders face tough decision on impeachment resolution Ocasio-Cortez accuses GOP leader of being 'complicit in advancing racism in America' MORE with what they say is evidence that lawmakers turned down the opportunity to preempt California’s authority in 2007, when debating a major energy conservation bill.

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It is a pushback against the administration’s proposal, released this summer, to revoke California’s authority. That revocation is part of a larger proposal, dubbed the Safer Affordable Fuel Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles rule, that would stop federal car efficiency and emissions rules from getting stronger between 2021 and 2026, as the Obama administration had envisioned.

“As elected officials who were deeply involved in the negotiation of the fuel economy provisions of [the Energy Independence and Security Act], we can attest to Congress’ intent that California’s authority under the Clean Air Act be preserved,” they wrote.

The senators said their evidence demonstrates “unequivocally that in the month before EISA was enacted, there were reported efforts on the part of the automobile industry, some members of Congress and the Bush administration to preempt, limit or otherwise constrain both EPA’s and California’s authority under the Clean Air Act.”

All the efforts were “rejected” and didn’t make it to the final law, they said.

When the 2007 bill was being debated, some in industry and some lawmakers were worried that the EPA, the Department of Transportation (DOT) and California would have overlapping or conflicting regulations on car efficiency.

The Obama administration resolved the potential issue by having both agencies and California agree to negotiate regulations together. But the Trump administration wants to undo that and revoke California’s authority to set separate rules.