House lawmakers introduce resolution to support Paris climate agreement

Dozens of House Democrats and one Republican introduced legislation Friday meant to demonstrate congressional support for the Paris climate agreement.

The short, nonbinding resolution would declare that Congress “reaffirms its commitment” to the 2015 pact that every other nation in the world has signed onto, and that the United States “should not withdraw.” The measure would not mandate that the U.S. return to the agreement.

The move is designed to rebuke President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden on Trump's refusal to commit to peaceful transfer of power: 'What country are we in?' Romney: 'Unthinkable and unacceptable' to not commit to peaceful transition of power Two Louisville police officers shot amid Breonna Taylor grand jury protests MORE’s 2017 announcement that the U.S. would pull out of the landmark global accord, under which nearly 200 countries made nonbinding pledges to limit or reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

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“I’m glad my colleagues on both sides of aisle are joining me on this bipartisan resolution to set the record straight and support the Paris agreement on climate action,” Rep. Jared HuffmanJared William HuffmanOVERNIGHT ENERGY: House Democrats tee up vote on climate-focused energy bill next week | EPA reappoints controversial leader to air quality advisory committee | Coronavirus creates delay in Pentagon research for alternative to 'forever chemicals' COVID-19 complicates California's record-setting wildfire season  Congress should investigate OAS actions in Bolivia MORE (D-Calif.), a lead sponsor of the legislation along with Reps. Don Beyer (D-Va.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickFlorida Democrat introduces bill to recognize Puerto Rico statehood referendum DCCC reserves new ad buys in competitive districts, adds new members to 'Red to Blue' program 2020 Global Tiger Day comes with good news, but Congress still has work to do MORE (R-Pa.), said in a statement.

“The Still-In Resolution is an important message that the world desperately needs to hear," Huffman said. "It's by no means the only thing this Congress needs to do on the climate crisis, but it's an important starting point.”

“Climate change must be addressed proactively with leaders from both sides of the aisle working to protect our planet,” Fitzpatrick said in Friday's statement. “I continue to urge the administration not to leave the Paris Climate Accord — but in the meantime, Congress should send a message to the world: the people of the United States remain committed to pursuing bipartisan solutions to address climate change and protect our environment.”

Fifty-eight other Democrats have signed on as initial sponsors.

Despite Trump’s announcement, the United States is still in the pact, meaning it's still expected to live up to the pledge former President Obama made to cut emissions 26 percent to 28 percent by 2025, when compared to 2005 levels.

The United States cannot fully withdraw from the agreement until November 2020 at the earliest.