Dems slam EPA plan for fighting drinking water contaminants

Democratic lawmakers are accusing the Trump administration of dragging its feet on plans to protect Americans from a key class of drinking water contaminants.

Lawmakers say the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) needs to commit to quickly setting a maximum allowable level in drinking water for per- and poly-fluoroalkyl (PFAS) substances, which have been linked to cancer and other health problems.

Acting EPA chief Andrew Wheeler rolled out an action plan for PFAS Thursday morning that includes cleaning up sources of contamination, helping local and state governments protect water sources and determining by the end of the year whether setting a maximum level for drinking water is appropriate.

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But for Democrats, the action is too little, too late.

“The PFAS Action Plan being trumpeted by EPA today is insufficiently protective, and it explains why Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler would not commit to setting a drinking water standard for PFAS during his nomination hearing last month,” Sen. Tom CarperThomas (Tom) Richard CarperSenators press Postal Service over complaints of slow delivery Barrasso nuclear bill latest GOP effort to boost uranium mining Lawmakers weigh increased telework as some agencies push federal workers back to the office MORE (Del.), the top Democrat on the Environment and Public Works Committee, said in a statement.

“It has taken the EPA nearly a year just to kick the can even further down the road,” he said. “While EPA acts with the utmost urgency to repeal regulations, the agency ambles with complacency when it comes to taking real steps to protect the water we drink and the air we breathe.”

House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman Frank Pallone (D-N.J.) and Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court upholds permit for B pipeline under Appalachian Trail | Report finds NOAA 'Sharpiegate' statement 'not based on science' but political influence | EPA faces suit over plan to release genetically engineered mosquito Report finds NOAA 'sharpiegate' statement 'not based on science' but political influence Democrats call for green energy relief in next stimulus package MORE (D-N.Y.), chairman of that panel’s environment subcommittee, said in a joint statement that they appreciated forward movement on the PFAS issue from the EPA, but found it disappointing.

“While we applaud aspects of this plan that respond to demands by members who have been pushing to address dangerous PFAS contamination in their districts, ultimately this plan fails to meet the challenge our nation faces with this growing water contamination and health crisis,” the chairmen said.

“If EPA intends to drag its feet, Congress will have to step in and lead the fight to protect Americans from these dangerous chemicals.”

PFAS contamination issues have arisen in many specific areas around the country where it was used in manufacturing, firefighting or other activities.

Democrats representing those areas find the EPA’s actions insufficient.

“It falls short of delivering the certainty that families impacted by PFAS exposure need and deserve,” said Sen. Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: GoDaddy CEO Aman Bhutani says DC policymakers need to do more to support ventures and 'solo-preneurs'; Federal unemployment benefits expire as coronavirus deal-making deadlocks Overnight Defense: Pompeo pressed on move to pull troops from Germany | Panel abruptly scraps confirmation hearing | Trump meets family of slain soldier Shaheen, Chabot call for action on new round of PPP loans MORE (D-N.H.).

“Without a commitment to develop enforceable drinking water standards for PFOA and PFOS, there’s no certainty that this strategy will sufficiently confront the challenges PFAS chemicals pose to states and affected communities,” she said, referring to two of the most common chemicals in the family.

At least one key Republican — Senate Environment and Public Works Committee Chairman John BarrassoJohn Anthony BarrassoLatest Trump proposal on endangered species could limit future habitat, critics say Republicans dismiss Trump proposal to delay election Barrasso nuclear bill latest GOP effort to boost uranium mining MORE (R-Wyo.), was left wanting more from the EPA.

“The Environmental Protection Agency’s PFAS plan is only a first step. As I have said before, EPA must speak clearly about the risk that this class of chemicals poses to public health and the environment,” he said in a statement.

“The agency must be willing to take decisive action where it is warranted.”

Other Republicans — even those who have been vocal on the need for more action on PFAS — welcomed the plan.

“I was pleased with the EPA’s announcement,” Sen. Shelley Moore CapitoShelley Wellons Moore CapitoFormer VA staffer charged with giving seven patients fatal insulin doses Senate GOP hedges on attending Trump's convention amid coronavirus uptick Republicans fear backlash over Trump's threatened veto on Confederate names MORE (R-W.Va.), who wants the agency to set a drinking water limit for the contaminants, told reporters.

“I think it’s certainly a step in the right direction, but it’s not a giant leap. And maybe we’ll get him to do the giant leap as we keep pushing,” she said.

“This action plan is a strong step forward for our community to continue to ensure our water is safe,” said Rep. Mike TurnerMichael Ray TurnerDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Congress rightfully rejects dangerous effort to cut defense budget by 10 percent Desiree Tims outraises longtime GOP Rep. Michael Turner by more than 0K in second quarter MORE (R-Ohio).

Rep. John ShimkusJohn Mondy ShimkusBottom line Bottom Line Overnight Energy: Trump rolls back Obama-era fuel efficiency standards | Controversial Keystone XL construction to proceed | Pressure mounts to close national parks amid pandemic MORE (Ill.), the top Republican on the Energy and Commerce Committee’s environment subcommittee, said he understood complaints that the EPA is kicking the can down the road, but he supports the plan as it was laid out.

“Don’t get me wrong, I wish it could go faster,” he told The Hill. “When you’re trying to deal with chemicals, and you’re questioning the safety of it, and what amount, you want that information out.”

But he said the EPA is trying to do the science well, and that takes time.

“You’d rather do good science, and have good standards, versus standards based upon emotion.”