Gabbard cites ‘concerns’ about ‘vagueness’ of Green New Deal

Democratic presidential hopeful Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardDemocrats debate in Houston: Who came out on top? Poll: Sanders and Biden now in statistical tie in New Hampshire Krystal Ball: Tulsi should be on the debate stage; Saagar Enjeti: Has the media given Biden a pass? MORE declined Wednesday to back the "Green New Deal," citing “concerns” about it.

“I have some concerns with the Green New Deal, and about some of the vagueness of the language in there, so have not co-sponsored the legislation,” the Hawaii congresswoman said when asked about the progressive plan to rapidly shift away from fossil fuels to fight climate change.

Gabbard’s position on the nonbinding resolution from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezBill Maher, Michael Moore spar over Democrats' strategy for 2020 Super PAC head spars with CNN's Cuomo over Ocasio-Cortez ad Young insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed MarkeyEdward (Ed) John MarkeyYoung insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight Ocasio-Cortez endorses Markey in Senate race amid speculation over Kennedy candidacy House votes to block drilling in Arctic refuge MORE (D-Mass.) is a contrast from her position three months ago.

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She spoke at a Capitol press conference in November to support the Green New Deal, alongside Ocasio-Cortez, other Democrats and youth activists.

“I am proud to stand here together with our friends, our allies, our colleagues, to fight for a green energy economy, the [Off Fossil Fuels] Act, other legislation that is there and a Green New Deal,” she said at the time.

The Green New Deal was then a draft resolution that called for the creation of a special House committee that would write legislation to eliminate fossil fuels from most of the economy in 10 years, provide a universal jobs guarantee, universal health care and other policies.

The latest iteration, as introduced by Ocasio-Cortez and Markey, would set a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, which would effectively mean an end to fossil fuel use in the next decade or so.

Nearly all of the Senate Democrats running for president have backed the Green New Deal. But Gabbard isn’t the first Democrat to criticize the it.

Former Rep. John DelaneyJohn Kevin DelaneyTrump campaign mocks Democratic debate: 'Another informercial for President Trump' The Hill's 12:30 Report: House panel approves impeachment powers Sanders slips in NH, Biden and Warren in statistical dead heat MORE (D-Md.), a long-shot presidential candidate, called the proposal “about as realistic as Trump saying that Mexico is going to pay for the wall.”

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) Manchin The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Trump, lawmakers consider app that would conduct background checks: report Conservatives offer stark warning to Trump, GOP on background checks MORE (D-W.Va.) called it a “dream” in a CNN interview last week.

“You can't just be a denier and say ‘I'm not going to use coal, I'm not going to use natural gas, I'm not going to use oil,’ ” he said.