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Gabbard cites ‘concerns’ about ‘vagueness’ of Green New Deal

Democratic presidential hopeful Rep. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardTulsi Gabbard blasts new House rules on gender neutral language as 'height of hypocrisy' A vaccine, a Burrito and more: 7 lighter, memorable moments from 2020 Growing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting MORE declined Wednesday to back the "Green New Deal," citing “concerns” about it.

“I have some concerns with the Green New Deal, and about some of the vagueness of the language in there, so have not co-sponsored the legislation,” the Hawaii congresswoman said when asked about the progressive plan to rapidly shift away from fossil fuels to fight climate change.

Gabbard’s position on the nonbinding resolution from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-Cortez'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate New York AG sues NYPD over excessive force at Black Lives Matter protests Pressley's chief of staff said her office's panic buttons 'had been torn out' before Capitol riot MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Ed MarkeyEd MarkeyFive centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote David Sirota: Democrats gave away leverage in forcing vote on ,000 checks Sanders to slow down NDAA veto override in bid to get vote on K checks proposal MORE (D-Mass.) is a contrast from her position three months ago.

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She spoke at a Capitol press conference in November to support the Green New Deal, alongside Ocasio-Cortez, other Democrats and youth activists.

“I am proud to stand here together with our friends, our allies, our colleagues, to fight for a green energy economy, the [Off Fossil Fuels] Act, other legislation that is there and a Green New Deal,” she said at the time.

The Green New Deal was then a draft resolution that called for the creation of a special House committee that would write legislation to eliminate fossil fuels from most of the economy in 10 years, provide a universal jobs guarantee, universal health care and other policies.

The latest iteration, as introduced by Ocasio-Cortez and Markey, would set a goal of net-zero greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, which would effectively mean an end to fossil fuel use in the next decade or so.

Nearly all of the Senate Democrats running for president have backed the Green New Deal. But Gabbard isn’t the first Democrat to criticize the it.

Former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis Eurasia Group founder Ian Bremmer says Trump right on China but wrong on WHO; CDC issues new guidance for large gatherings The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what 'policing' means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight MORE (D-Md.), a long-shot presidential candidate, called the proposal “about as realistic as Trump saying that Mexico is going to pay for the wall.”

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) Manchin'Almost Heaven, West Virginia' — Joe Manchin and a 50-50 Senate McConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time GOP lawmakers introduce resolution to censure Trump over Capitol riot MORE (D-W.Va.) called it a “dream” in a CNN interview last week.

“You can't just be a denier and say ‘I'm not going to use coal, I'm not going to use natural gas, I'm not going to use oil,’ ” he said.