Trump mocks wind power: 'When the wind doesn't blow, just turn off the television'

President TrumpDonald John TrumpAdvisor: Sanders could beat Trump in Texas Bloomberg rips Sanders over Castro comments What coronavirus teaches us for preventing the next big bio threat MORE on Wednesday mocked the idea of fostering wind power, suggesting that it would devalue property and undermine U.S. output of other energy forms.

Trump touted at an event in Ohio that the U.S. was the largest producer of crude oil and natural gas in the world. He suggested that would not have been the case had Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonBiden faces do-or-die primary in South Carolina President Trump's assault on checks and balances: Five acts in four weeks Schiff blasts Trump for making 'false claims' about Russia intel: 'You've betrayed America. Again' MORE won the 2016 election.

"Hillary wanted to put windmills all over the place," he told workers at a tank factory in Lima, Ohio.

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Trump then mimicked a man telling his spouse to "turn off the television" when the wind doesn't blow in order to save electricity. The joke was reminiscent of a similar line he delivered earlier this month at the Conservative Political Action Conference in which derided the Green New Deal.

"Put the windmills up, and watch the value of your house if you’re in sight of a windmill — watch the value of your house go down by 65 percent," he said Wednesday. "Wonderful to have windmills. And solar’s wonderful too, but it’s not strong enough, and it’s very very expensive."

Trump campaigned on restoring coal mining jobs. Since taking office, his administration has rolled back regulations and the president has highlighted the boom in the energy industry as a sign of economic strength.

Former White House economic adviser Gary CohnGary David CohnBannon says Trump now understands how to use presidential power: 'The pearl-clutchers better get used to it' Sunday shows - All eyes on Senate impeachment trial Gary Cohn says Trump's tariffs 'hurt the US' MORE said in an interview earlier this month that he sought to convince Trump to focus on promoting jobs in the solar sector given the industry's potential longevity but that the president insisted the administration should keep its attention on coal jobs.

Trump has found fresh fodder in Democratic efforts to promote the Green New Deal, an ambitious proposal that seeks to reduce carbon emissions and focus on more environmentally friendly practices. The president previously quipped that the measure sounded like a "high school term paper that got a low mark."