Trump Interior chief says climate change response falls on Congress

Trump Interior chief says climate change response falls on Congress
© Greg Nash

Interior Secretary David Bernhardt defended his position on climate change and record on ethics while speaking before lawmakers Tuesday to discuss his agency's proposed budget.

In his first hearing since being sworn in as secretary, the Trump administration official frequently put the onus on lawmakers for responding to global warming. He said that while he believes in climate change, Congress has not directed him to respond to it.

“Isn’t this your job?” Bernhardt asked Rep. Chellie PingreeRochelle (Chellie) PingreeCongress can make progress on fighting emissions with Zero Food Waste Act House Democrats include immigration priorities as they forward DHS funding bill Shakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' MORE (D-Maine) when pushed to share his views on climate change during a subcommittee hearing for the House Appropriations Committee. “You’re a political leader right now that we are counting on.”

Bernhardt told the committee that there are more than 600 instances in current laws where the secretary is directed that he or she “shall” do something.

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“You know what there’s not – is a ‘shall’ for ‘I shall manage the land to stop climate change’ or something similar to that,” he said.

Bernhardt also discussed development of fossil fuels on public lands, saying he would not stop oil and gas development – including offshore drilling – without direction from Congress.

The Trump Cabinet official also clarified that his department will finish its five-year drilling plan, despite reports that it was indefinitely sidelined.

Bernhardt repeatedly emphasized that concerns from states would be paramount in making a determination at the federal level.

“I’m not aware of a single lease that was ever developed over the opposition of a state,” he said.

But Rep. Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanLawmakers spend more on personal security in wake of insurrection Biden administration criticized over report that it is not extending home confinement for prisoners Group launches first national ad campaign to celebrate America's 250th anniversary MORE (D-N.J.) questioned why Interior was continuing to process permits for seismic exploration of underwater oil reserves up and down the Atlantic Coast, particularly given the risks the process poses to marine life.

“We shouldn’t be afraid of information. If we can do it properly and it can be done responsibly, the data itself is not something we should be afraid of,” he said.

Some of the hearings most heated exchanges came in response to questions over Bernhardt’s ethics records.

Many of the ethics investigations from Bernhardt’s predecessor, Ryan ZinkeRyan Keith ZinkeWant to evaluate Donald Trump's judgment? Listen to Donald Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Biden launches blitz for jobs plan with 'thank you, Georgia' OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Court sets in motion EPA ban on pesticide linked to developmental issues | Trump Interior Secretary Zinke files to run for Congress, again | Senate passes bipartisan B water infrastructure bill MORE, are still underway, and Bernhardt himself is being investigated along with six other Interior staffers.

Democrats have requested interviews with a number of Interior officials, and Rep. Brenda LawrenceBrenda Lulenar LawrenceBlack caucus chair arrested at Capitol during voting rights protest Supreme Court deals blow to Black Caucus voting rights efforts Democrats introduce equal pay legislation for US national team athletes MORE (D-Mich.) said Bernhardt has refused to schedule those interviews, sending documents instead. 

“We as Congress asked them to come and last I check you don’t determine how we get our information,” Lawrence said.

Democrats have threatened to block the salaries of Interior officials and others who refuse to testify before Congress.

Rep. Mike QuigleyMichael (Mike) Bruce QuigleyGyms, hotels, bus companies make last-ditch plea for aid Carole Baskin: People 'will be outraged' by conditions exotic animals face House panel includes 0 million election security grant in proposed appropriations bill MORE (D-Ill.) said even by Chicago standards, “it’s pretty impressive four days into your tenure the inspector general opens an investigation into your ‘wide assortment of questionable conduct on your part.’”

Quigley repeatedly accused Bernhardt, a former oil lobbyist who was confirmed to the administration last month, of acting in the interests of his former lobbying clients. Bernhardt responded that he was working for American interests.

Legislators have long questioned Bernhardt's industry ties given his background as a lobbyist, and Democrats have pushed for more details about how top staff keeps track of Bernhardt's calendar and meetings with industry representatives.

Bernhardt appeared Tuesday to discuss the Trump administration's budget for the Department of the Interior, which calls for a 14 percent cut to the agency – roughly $2 billion less than last year.

Congress has consistently rejected the budget cuts proposed by President TrumpDonald TrumpFormer New York state Senate candidate charged in riot Trump called acting attorney general almost daily to push election voter fraud claim: report GOP senator clashes with radio caller who wants identity of cop who shot Babbitt MORE's White House and offered increases to the Department of Interior and other agencies.

Subcommittee chair Betty McCollumBetty Louise McCollumFunding fight imperils National Guard ops Overnight Defense: Former Defense Secretary Rumsfeld dies at 88 | Trump calls on Milley to resign | House subpanel advances Pentagon spending bill House subcommittee advances 6B Pentagon spending bill MORE (D-Minn.) said the Democratic-led House panel would likely reject what she called the “unrealistic funding levels in the Trump budget.”