2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils $4T climate plan

2020 hopeful John Delaney unveils $4T climate plan
© Greg Nash

John DelaneyJohn DelaneyCoronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis Eurasia Group founder Ian Bremmer says Trump right on China but wrong on WHO; CDC issues new guidance for large gatherings The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas says country needs to rethink what 'policing' means; US cases surpass 2 million with no end to pandemic in sight MORE is adding his name to a growing list of Democratic presidential hopefuls rolling out climate action plans, with a $4 trillion proposal announced on Thursday.

The former Maryland congressman's plan focuses on six key areas to tackle the “climate crisis,” including an introduction of a carbon tax, renewable energy investments and funding carbon capture technology.

“We have to act on climate and we have to act now,” Delaney said in a statement. “We need a real plan to hit our goals and we have to listen to actual scientists. This is a real plan that all Americans can support. It is full of new ideas and massive investments in innovation that will both deal with climate change and create jobs in the heartland and all across our country.”

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He said the plan outlines initiatives he would achieve within the first 100 days of taking the presidency.

Delaney’s campaign called his commitment to a carbon tax, or fee, the largest component of his climate plan. He proposes starting the fee on carbon pollution at $15 per metric ton of Co2 and increasing the cost by $10 every year. The issue was an important one for Delaney while he was in Congress. He introduced the first bipartisan carbon fee and dividend bill in over 10 years, according to his campaign.

He said his plan would reduce carbon emissions by 90 percent by 2050.

Delaney is the fourth Democratic presidential candidate to release a comprehensive climate action plan, following Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeHarris climate agenda stresses need for justice OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Watchdog report raises new questions for top Interior lawyer | Senate Democrats ask Trump to withdraw controversial public lands nominee | Border wall water use threatens endangered species, environmentalists say Why a rising star is leaving Congress MORE, Colorado Sen. Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetKamala Harris makes history — as a Westerner Expanding our health force can save lives and create jobs simultaneously How Congress is preventing a Medicare bankruptcy during COVID-19 MORE and former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, who announced a $5 trillion proposal.

Many of the party's 2020 candidates have also embraced climate change as a key issue to their campaigns.

Sens. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenOvernight Energy: Major oil companies oppose Trump admin's methane rollback | Union files unfair labor practice charge against EPA USPS inspector general reviewing DeJoy's policy changes Former Obama speechwriter Favreau: 'Hilarious' some media outlets calling Harris a moderate MORE (D-Mass.) and Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerNew Jersey governor to announce state will move to mostly mail-in voting for November The Memo: Trump attacks on Harris risk backfiring On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' MORE (D-NJ.) have both introduced policy plans that touch on curbing carbon emissions. Warren also last week called for a primary debate solely focused on climate change.

Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharElection security advocates see strong ally in Harris The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence California Democrats back Yang after he expresses disappointment over initial DNC lineup MORE (D-Minn.) and Bernie SandersBernie SandersFormer Obama speechwriter Favreau: 'Hilarious' some media outlets calling Harris a moderate Trump to counter DNC with travel to swing states Progressives look to flex their muscle in next Congress after primary wins MORE (I-Vt.), meanwhile, have both pledged to refuse campaign donations from the fossil fuel industry and embraced the Green New Deal progressive climate plan.

Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenOn The Money: Economists flabbergasted after Congress leaves with no deal | Markets rise as the economy struggles | Retail sales slow in July Congress exits with no deal, leaving economists flabbergasted Trump touts NYC police union endorsement: 'Pro-cop all the way' MORE is also working on his own climate plan, which is expected to have a more moderate focus.

South Bend, Ind. Mayor Pete ButtigiegPete ButtigiegThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - The choice: Biden-Harris vs. Trump-Pence California Democrats back Yang after he expresses disappointment over initial DNC lineup Obamas, Clintons to headline Biden's nominating convention MORE is the only other 2020 candidate to say he will aim for a carbon tax if elected. Last week, he laid out some policy positions that pointed towards supporting a tax on carbon.

A carbon tax has been a hot topic of late. On Wednesday, the CEOs of 75 major businesses, including Microsoft and BP, flooded Capitol Hill to preach the implementation of a federal carbon tax to lawmakers on both sides of the aisle.

The issue is largely considered a moot point with Republicans controlling the Senate and the White House.