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Trump administration officially revokes California tailpipe emissions waiver

The Trump administration on Thursday officially revoked California's tailpipe waiver under the Clean Air Act, a decision likely to face quick legal challenges.

The Department of Transportation and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) unveiled the “One National Program Rule,” giving the federal government sole authority to set emission standards for cars.

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The rule is part of the administration's Safer, Affordable, Fuel-Efficient (SAFE) Vehicles Rule, a draft of which was submitted to the White House in August.

The second part of the rule will include a final decision over what fuel efficiency levels to set emissions at starting in 2025.

Revoking California's waiver will also affect 13 other states that adopt California’s tougher emissions standards.

“One national standard provides much-needed regulatory certainty for the automotive industry and sets the stage for the Trump Administration’s final SAFE rule that will save lives and promote economic growth by reducing the price of new vehicles to help more Americans purchase newer, cleaner, and safer cars and trucks," EPA Administrator Andrew WheelerAndrew WheelerThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden: Let's make a deal on infrastructure, taxes Overnight Energy: EPA pledges new focus on environmental justice | Republicans probe EPA firing of Trump-appointed science advisers | Biden administration asks court to toss kids' climate lawsuit Republicans probe EPA firing of Trump-appointed science advisers MORE said in a statement.

President TrumpDonald TrumpHarry Reid reacts to Boehner book excerpt: 'We didn't mince words' Man arrested for allegedly threatening to stab undercover Asian officer in NYC Trump says GOP will take White House in 2024 in prepared speech MORE on Wednesday tweeted that the waiver would be revoked while he was fundraising in California.

California Attorney General Xavier BecerraXavier BecerraOver 500,000 people sign up for ObamaCare in special sign-up period Harris in difficult starring role on border Biden's HHS commits another M to ad campaign touting expanded health care coverage MORE (D) has threatened to sue the administration if it moved to revoke the state's waiver. The state has relied on the waiver process to set their own tougher emissions standards for about 50 years. 

“There's no question, of course, that we will be in court," California Air Resources Board Chairwoman Mary Nichols said in a press conference Wednesday.

“This is the fight of a lifetime. We have to win this,” she added.

California sees the waiver as an important states' rights battle. The state says tougher emissions standards are necessary to fight climate change and reduce air pollution.

Rebecca Beitsch contributed reporting.