Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system

Williamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system
© Greg Nash

Presidential candidate and author Marianne WilliamsonMarianne WilliamsonMarianne Williamson calls federal judge's handling of Steven Donziger case 'unconstitutional' Marianne Williamson calls on Biden to drop efforts to extradite Assange Susan Sarandon and Marianne Williamson call for justice in Steven Donziger case MORE described climate change as one symptom of an “amoral” economic system at MSNBC’s climate forum at Georgetown University on Thursday.

Williamson blamed what she called a "virulent strain of capitalism that puts short-term shareholder profit before all else, before the safety and welfare of the workers, before the safety and welfare of the environment."

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“The issue here is not that we have an economic system that is immoral, but that we have an economic system that is amoral,” she told moderator Ali Velshi, leading to "immoral consequences."

“A very large number of people suffer because of that, and that’s why we need a revolution in our times,” Williamson continued. "Our biggest issue when it comes to climate change is psychological: It's a massive state of denial.”

Williamson said addressing climate change would be an undertaking on the level of World War II.

"The first thing we have to do is deal with people's nature psychologically and emotionally integrate that understanding,” she added.

Williamson was one of several candidates participating in the forum, including Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersBiden's bipartisan deal faces Senate gauntlet Angst grips America's most liberal city Democrats warn shrinking Biden's spending plan could backfire MORE (I-Vt.) and Michael BennetMichael Farrand BennetLawmakers can't reconcile weakening the SALT cap with progressive goals How Sen. Graham can help fix the labor shortage with commonsense immigration reform For true American prosperity, make the child tax credit permanent MORE (D-Colo.), entrepreneur Andrew YangAndrew YangPoll: 73 percent of Democratic voters would consider voting for Biden in the 2024 primary Kings launch voting rights effort honoring John Lewis Eric Adams to meet with Biden on curbing gun violence MORE, Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanHouse passes spending bill to boost Capitol Police and Hill staffer pay Tim Ryan slams McCarthy for mocking Capitol physician, mask mandate Six takeaways: What the FEC reports tell us about the midterm elections MORE (D-Ohio), former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julián Castro and former Rep. John DelaneyJohn DelaneyDirect air capture is a crucial bipartisan climate policy Lobbying world Coronavirus Report: The Hill's Steve Clemons interviews Rep. Rodney Davis MORE (D-Md.).