Trump: I think about climate change 'all the time'

Trump: I think about climate change 'all the time'
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President TrumpDonald John TrumpSchiff pleads to Senate GOP: 'Right matters. And the truth matters.' Anita Hill to Iowa crowd: 'Statute of limitations' for Biden apology is 'up' Sen. Van Hollen releases documents from GAO investigation MORE on Tuesday said he thinks about climate change “all the time” in response to a question comparing his stance on the issue to other foreign leaders.

Speaking to the media alongside Canadian Prime Minister Justin TrudeauJustin Pierre James TrudeauIran expected to send Ukraine the black boxes from downed passenger plane Poll: Most Canadian taxpayers don't want to pay for Prince Harry and Meghan Markle's security costs Trudeau: Escalating 'tensions' with Iran to blame for downed jet MORE at the NATO summit in London, Trump said “climate change is very important to me."

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“I’ve done many environmental impact statements over my life,” Trump said, apparently referring to his experience as a real estate developer. “I believe very strongly in very, very crystal clear, clean water and clean air. That's a big part of climate change."

When asked if he is concerned about rising sea levels globally, Trump said is he “concerned about everything.”

 


“But I'm also concerned about nuclear proliferation which is a very important topic and it's a topic that we're gonna discuss today,” he added.

Trump last month said he is “very much into climate,” with those remarks coming just days after the United States formally left the landmark Paris climate accord, a decision made by Trump.

Since entering the White House, Trump has rolled back Environmental Protection Agency regulations on methane and replaced an Obama-era rule regulating power plant emissions, among many other environmental policy decisions that have drawn the ire of environmentalists and Democrats.

Canada remains in the Paris agreement and has a goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 30 percent below 2005 levels by 2030.