Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners

Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners
© Greg Nash

Several Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee slammed bipartisan legislation to gradually reduce the use of heat-trapping chemicals in air conditioners and refrigerators, arguing the measure would raise costs for consumers.

At a committee hearing to discuss a bill that would reduce the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), the GOP criticism was led by Rep. Markwayne MullinMarkwayne MullinFive takeaways from PPP loan data Lawmaker-linked businesses received PPP loans The United States must stand with Georgia's fight for freedom MORE (R-Okla.), who railed against replacement costs and the possibility of needing to replace HFCs with a mildly flammable alternative.

"The consumer is the one that's getting hit with this," Mullin said.

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He later told The Hill that he would only sign on to the measure if it included "consumer choice."

"Don't force this system out," he said. "Just allow the consumers to make the decision."

David Doniger, senior strategic director at the Natural Resources Defense Council, warned lawmakers of the environmental impact of HFCs, which he said have "hundreds to thousands of times the heat-trapping power of carbon dioxide."

Democrats, meanwhile, rallied around the legislation introduced by Rep. Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Supreme Court upholds permit for B pipeline under Appalachian Trail | Report finds NOAA 'Sharpiegate' statement 'not based on science' but political influence | EPA faces suit over plan to release genetically engineered mosquito Report finds NOAA 'sharpiegate' statement 'not based on science' but political influence Democrats call for green energy relief in next stimulus package MORE (D-N.Y.) and co-sponsored by Reps. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonThe Hill's Campaign Report: Florida's coronavirus surge raises questions about GOP convention People over politics on PPP funding Kulkarni wins Texas House Democratic primary MORE (R-Texas), Scott PetersScott H. PetersThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The American Investment Council - Trump, Pence tested, in more ways than one House Democrats press Pelosi for automatic unemployment insurance and food stamp extensions Issa advances in bid to fill Hunter's vacant House seat MORE (D-Calif.) and Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Fauci 'aspirationally hopeful' of a vaccine by winter Pentagon: 'No corroborating evidence' yet to validate troop bounty allegations Overnight Defense: Lawmakers demand answers on reported Russian bounties for US troops deaths in Afghanistan | Defense bill amendments target Germany withdrawal, Pentagon program giving weapons to police MORE (R-N.Y.).

Tonko said after the hearing that he was not concerned about the opposition from his GOP colleagues.

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"I think there's a way to build consensus," he told reporters, but did not elaborate.

The bill, which has not been scheduled for a markup, has support from both environmental advocates and industry leaders.

Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute board chairman John Galyen told lawmakers Tuesday that the measure would "create American jobs, stimulate investment, and boost exports."

Similar legislation has been introduced in the Senate by Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.). It has several bipartisan co-sponsors.