Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners

Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners
© Greg Nash

Several Republicans on the House Energy and Commerce Committee slammed bipartisan legislation to gradually reduce the use of heat-trapping chemicals in air conditioners and refrigerators, arguing the measure would raise costs for consumers.

At a committee hearing to discuss a bill that would reduce the use of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), the GOP criticism was led by Rep. Markwayne MullinMarkwayne MullinGOP lawmaker says he did not threaten US Embassy staff in Tajikistan The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by AT&T - Supreme Court lets Texas abortion law stand The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by AT&T - Defiant Biden defends US exit from Afghanistan MORE (R-Okla.), who railed against replacement costs and the possibility of needing to replace HFCs with a mildly flammable alternative.

"The consumer is the one that's getting hit with this," Mullin said.

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He later told The Hill that he would only sign on to the measure if it included "consumer choice."

"Don't force this system out," he said. "Just allow the consumers to make the decision."

David Doniger, senior strategic director at the Natural Resources Defense Council, warned lawmakers of the environmental impact of HFCs, which he said have "hundreds to thousands of times the heat-trapping power of carbon dioxide."

Democrats, meanwhile, rallied around the legislation introduced by Rep. Paul TonkoPaul David TonkoManchin puts foot down on key climate provision in spending bill House Democrats outline plan for transition to clean electricity The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by AT&T - Final countdown: Senate inches toward last infrastructure vote MORE (D-N.Y.) and co-sponsored by Reps. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonHouse Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Republican Fort Bend County Sheriff wins Texas House seat 10 bellwether House races to watch on election night MORE (R-Texas), Scott PetersScott H. PetersHouse Democrat votes against advancing party's .5T plan House panel advances .5T spending bill WHIP LIST: How House Democrats say they'll vote on infrastructure bill MORE (D-Calif.) and Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWyoming county GOP rejects effort to rescind Cheney's party status Stefanik in ad says Democrats want 'permanent election insurrection' GOP leader taking proxy voting fight to Supreme Court MORE (R-N.Y.).

Tonko said after the hearing that he was not concerned about the opposition from his GOP colleagues.

"I think there's a way to build consensus," he told reporters, but did not elaborate.

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The bill, which has not been scheduled for a markup, has support from both environmental advocates and industry leaders.

Air-Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Institute board chairman John Galyen told lawmakers Tuesday that the measure would "create American jobs, stimulate investment, and boost exports."

Similar legislation has been introduced in the Senate by Sen. John KennedyJohn Neely KennedyMORE (R-La.). It has several bipartisan co-sponsors.