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Ex-Inslee staffers launch climate group with $1.5T stimulus proposal

Ex-Inslee staffers launch climate group with $1.5T stimulus proposal
© CNN

A group of former staffers who worked on Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeWashington, Oregon, Nevada join California plan to review COVID-19 vaccine 10 under-the-radar races to watch in November On The Trail: A third coronavirus wave builds just before Election Day MORE’s (D) presidential campaign formally announced on Thursday the launch of a group that aims to push Congress and presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe BidenJoe BidenHillary Clinton responds to Chrissy Teigen tweet: 'I love you back' Supreme Court rejects Trump effort to shorten North Carolina mail-ballot deadline Overnight Defense: Trump campaign's use of military helicopter raises ethics concerns | Air Force jets intercept aircraft over Trump rally | Senators introduce bill to expand visa screenings MORE on climate issues. 

The group, called Evergreen, previously put forward a 200-page climate manifesto that included portions of the then-candidate’s climate plan including the goals of 100 percent clean electricity by 2035, slashing subsidies for the fossil fuel industry, creating a Climate Conservation Corps, and revitalizing the economy through investment in green technology and clean energy. 

On Thursday, the group, along with progressive think tank Data for Progress, proposed what it called a “Clean Jumpstart” $1.5 trillion coronavirus stimulus plan. 

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They call for federally funding state and local clean energy programs and providing incentives for technology in the areas such as renewable energy, energy efficiency and electric vehicles, among other provisions. 

“What we’re putting forward here is quite concrete and actionable, but it’s also very big vision,” said Evergreen co-founder Bracken Hendricks. 

Hendricks added that the approximately 30-page proposal aims to drill down on a “transformative investment package” based on Inslee’s climate plan. 

The launch comes as the House considers its own $3 trillion coronavirus bill, which includes provisions that aim to prevent utility shutoffs due to customers’ inability to pay but does not have clean energy-specific measures.