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Biden campaign adopts carbon-free power by 2035 in $2T environment plan 

Biden campaign adopts carbon-free power by 2035 in $2T environment plan 
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Former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenPennsylvania Supreme Court strikes down GOP bid to stop election certification Biden looks to career officials to restore trust, morale in government agencies Biden transition adds new members to coronavirus task force MORE will aim to make electricity generation carbon free by 2035 as part of a $2 trillion climate and infrastructure plan should he win the White House in November.

The plan, unveiled Tuesday, comes as an addition to the Democratic candidate’s existing climate plan, which calls for a $1.7 million federal investment as the left wing of the party has sought to push him farther on environmental issues.

Biden’s new proposal also includes investing in 500,000 electric vehicle charging stations, creating a new climate research agency and halving the carbon footprint of buildings by 2035, including by upgrading 4 million buildings. 

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Some of the ideas in the plan, notably the 2035 carbon-free power target, echo recommendations set by a task force made up of supporters of both Biden and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersClub for Growth to launch ad blitz in Georgia to juice GOP turnout Inequality of student loan debt underscores possible Biden policy shift In defense of incrementalism: A call for radical realism MORE (I-Vt.), a former progressive rival for the Democratic presidential nomination. 

The two co-chairs of that panel were Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezClub for Growth to launch ad blitz in Georgia to juice GOP turnout Trump will soon be out of office — but polarization isn't going anywhere Trump tweets Thanksgiving criticism of NFL QBs for kneeling MORE (D-N.Y.), who had endorsed Sanders, and 2004 Democratic presidential nominee John KerryJohn Forbes KerryBiden's Cabinet a battleground for future GOP White House hopefuls Biden's climate plans can cut emissions and also be good politics Biden soars as leader of the free world MORE

In infrastructure, the plan calls for all U.S.-made buses to be zero-emission by 2030 and endorses “ambitious” fuel economy standards, although it does not specify what those will be. 

Biden also wants to create a “Civilian Climate Corps” that will take on a variety of jobs, including conserving public lands, planting trees, repairing irrigation systems and protecting coastal ecosystems. His plan also aims to create 250,000 jobs to plug abandoned oil and gas wells. 

And his new plans calls for creating an Environmental and Climate Justice Division to “hold polluters accountable.” The plan credits Washington Gov. Jay InsleeJay Robert InsleeWashington county warns of at least 17 positive tests after 300-person wedding The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by UAE - US records 1 million COVID-19 cases in a week; governors crack down Washington state issues sweeping restrictions to combat coronavirus surge MORE (D), another former presidential candidate, with this idea. 

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The former vice president’s plan would also tackle a class of cancer-linked chemicals known as PFAS by designating it a hazardous substance and setting enforceable limits. 

Aiming to address environmental inequalities in communities of color and low-income communities, the plan intends to target 40 percent of the clean energy investment in disadvantaged communities. 

The new plan already garnered some praise among environmentalists. 

“Joe Biden’s climate plan—by a long shot—is the most ambitious we have ever seen from any president in our nation’s history,” Gina McCarthyRegina (Gina) McCarthyEPA halts planned Taiwan trip for Wheeler OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Barrasso to seek top spot on Energy and Natural Resources Committee | Forest Service finalizes rule weakening environmental review of its projects | Biden to enlist Agriculture, Transportation agencies in climate fight OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Trump replaces head of energy regulatory commission | Biden climate agenda would slam into Senate GOP roadblocks | Emails show Park Police reliance on pepper balls, outside police forces during Lafayette protests MORE, who led the Environmental Protection Agency during the Obama administration, said in a statement. “This is the kind of leadership we need in the face of a challenge of this scale.”